Session Title

Ain't Misbehaving: Medieval English Women Doing Good Work by Nefarious Means

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM); Pearl-Poet Society

Organizer Name

Ashley E. Bartelt; Mickey Sweeney

Organizer Affiliation

Northern Illinois Univ.; Dominican Univ.

Presider Name

Alison Langdon

Presider Affiliation

Western Kentucky Univ.

Paper Title 1

The Midwife in Lay Le Freine: The Misuse of Power for the Preservation of Souls

Presenter 1 Name

Kimberly Tate Anderson

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Wittenberg Univ.

Paper Title 2

Good Women, Bad Men: The Cost of Saving Souls

Presenter 2 Name

Mickey Sweeney

Paper Title 3

Malory's Dame Brusen: Good or Evil?

Presenter 3 Name

Katharine Mudd

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Northern Illinois Univ.

Paper Title 4

Griselda and Co.: The Nefarious Work of Well-Behaved Women

Presenter 4 Name

Sharon E. Rhodes

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

9-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

This panel explores possibilities provided to medieval authors when female characters seem to act against accepted norms in order to do good. Rules of best behavior for women were often dictated by Christian or social/patriarchal desires, but it is also clear that--likely influenced by what may well have constituted the actual behavior of medieval English women—narratives may require female characters who step well beyond such boundaries through words or actions. Such discrepancies open up meaning for the texts being analyzed while providing insight into gender relations within and beyond their constructed narratives. Alison Langdon

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Ain't Misbehaving: Medieval English Women Doing Good Work by Nefarious Means

Bernhard 210

This panel explores possibilities provided to medieval authors when female characters seem to act against accepted norms in order to do good. Rules of best behavior for women were often dictated by Christian or social/patriarchal desires, but it is also clear that--likely influenced by what may well have constituted the actual behavior of medieval English women—narratives may require female characters who step well beyond such boundaries through words or actions. Such discrepancies open up meaning for the texts being analyzed while providing insight into gender relations within and beyond their constructed narratives. Alison Langdon