Session Title

The Social Dynamics of Religious Dissent II: The Social Impact of Inquisitions and Anti-Inquisitorial Resistance

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centrum pro digitální výzkum náboženství, Masarykova Univ.

Organizer Name

David Zbíral; Robert L. J. Shaw

Organizer Affiliation

Centrum pro digitální výzkum náboženství, Masarykova Univ.; Centrum pro digitální výzkum náboženství, Masarykova Univ.

Presider Name

Delfi I. Nieto-Isabel

Presider Affiliation

Institut de Recerca en Cultures Medievals (IRCVM), Univ. de Barcelona

Paper Title 1

Guilt by Association? Social Patterns of Inquisition Punishments in Thirteenth-Century Languedoc

Presenter 1 Name

Robert L. J. Shaw

Paper Title 2

Function of the Inquisitio hereticæ pravitatis in the Languedoc from 1305 to 1325

Presenter 2 Name

Derek Hill

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent scholar

Paper Title 3

Waldensians on the Run: Refugees and Persecution of Heresy in Germany, 1390-1404

Presenter 3 Name

Eugene Smelyansky

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Washington State Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 2335

Description

The records of inquisitions provide us with an invaluable source for the social history of the regions in which they took place. It cannot be forgotten, however, that the inquisitors who recorded these details also had a major effect on both dissident communities and wider society through their operations. While there has been much discussion of the way inquisitors ‘constructed’ heresy, or represented an increasingly persecuting society, this session seeks to follow the pioneering lead of James Given in exploring the social stresses and strains created by inquisitions, social strategies for coping with investigation, and resistance to authority.

David Zbíral & Robert L. J. Shaw

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

The Social Dynamics of Religious Dissent II: The Social Impact of Inquisitions and Anti-Inquisitorial Resistance

Schneider 2335

The records of inquisitions provide us with an invaluable source for the social history of the regions in which they took place. It cannot be forgotten, however, that the inquisitors who recorded these details also had a major effect on both dissident communities and wider society through their operations. While there has been much discussion of the way inquisitors ‘constructed’ heresy, or represented an increasingly persecuting society, this session seeks to follow the pioneering lead of James Given in exploring the social stresses and strains created by inquisitions, social strategies for coping with investigation, and resistance to authority.

David Zbíral & Robert L. J. Shaw