Session Title

Medieval Interdisciplinarity: Medical and Scientific Knowledge Transfer in Medieval Southern Italy

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages; Society for Beneventan Studies

Organizer Name

Andrew J. M. Irving

Organizer Affiliation

Rijksuniv. Groningen

Presider Name

Andrew J. M. Irving

Paper Title 1

Establishing a Space for Medicine at Montecassino: Hildemar of Corbie's Expositio of the Rule of Saint Benedict (Montecassino, Arch. dell'Abbazia, Cod. 175)

Presenter 1 Name

Jeffrey Doolittle

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Paper Title 2

Salerno and the Articella in the Twelfth Century: Problems and Prospects

Presenter 2 Name

F. Eliza Glaze

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Coastal Carolina Univ.

Paper Title 3

Medicine, Rhetoric, Theological Debate: Scribes and their Personal Dossiers in the Production of Aberdeen MS. 106

Presenter 3 Name

Francis Newton

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Duke Univ.

Start Date

7-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1320

Description

The importance of Montecassino and the Beneventan Zone in the history of the transmission of the classics for the trivium has long been recognized. Only recently has the pivotal role of the Zone for the history of the collection, translation, transmission and dissemination of scientific works come to the fore. The session build on new/forthcoming publications on key Southern Italian manuscript witnesses of this transfer asks how knowledge transfer (particular of works of the quadrivium and medical sciences) occurred (into, within, and from the Zone), and what was the relationship between innovative learning across the sciences. Andrew J. M. Irving

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May 7th, 1:30 PM

Medieval Interdisciplinarity: Medical and Scientific Knowledge Transfer in Medieval Southern Italy

Sangren 1320

The importance of Montecassino and the Beneventan Zone in the history of the transmission of the classics for the trivium has long been recognized. Only recently has the pivotal role of the Zone for the history of the collection, translation, transmission and dissemination of scientific works come to the fore. The session build on new/forthcoming publications on key Southern Italian manuscript witnesses of this transfer asks how knowledge transfer (particular of works of the quadrivium and medical sciences) occurred (into, within, and from the Zone), and what was the relationship between innovative learning across the sciences. Andrew J. M. Irving