Session Title

Academic Labor Justice in Medieval Studies (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

BABEL Working Group; Medievalists of Color

Organizer Name

Afrodesia E. McCannon; Julie Orlemanski

Organizer Affiliation

New York Univ.; Univ. of Chicago

Presider Name

Afrodesia E. McCannon

Paper Title 1

What are the Sites of Academic Labor Justice?

Presenter 1 Name

Julie Orlemanski

Paper Title 2

"7K or Strike": The Fight for a Fair Union in Higher Education

Presenter 2 Name

Boyda J. Johnstone

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

Paper Title 3

Academic Liminality

Presenter 3 Name

Kavita Mudan Finn

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Paper Title 4

Some Thoughts on Labor Organizing in the Academy

Presenter 4 Name

Lisa M. C. Weston

Presenter 4 Affiliation

California State Univ.-Fresno

Paper Title 5

Emotional Labor, Privilege, and Anti-Racism in and out of the Classroom

Presenter 5 Name

Marjorie Housley

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Start Date

8-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

This roundtable takes as its topic the inequities that organize academic labor in medieval studies—and what we might do about them. Such inequities are, of course, not unique to research and teaching on the Middle Ages: the recognition, remuneration, and precarity of work have long been distributed unevenly across higher education. But there are also labor contexts unique to medieval studies now, like the burden placed on medievalists of color, or queer scholars, to educate the field and commentate controversies. How can we as medievalists respond to such labor conditions with tactics of solidarity, mutual aid, and practical awareness? Panelists are encouraged to explore how labor conditions affect the field of medieval studies and how one might respond best to those conditions. Keywords: labor, justice, recognition, solidarity, work, precarity. Julie Orlemanski

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May 8th, 3:30 PM

Academic Labor Justice in Medieval Studies (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1005

This roundtable takes as its topic the inequities that organize academic labor in medieval studies—and what we might do about them. Such inequities are, of course, not unique to research and teaching on the Middle Ages: the recognition, remuneration, and precarity of work have long been distributed unevenly across higher education. But there are also labor contexts unique to medieval studies now, like the burden placed on medievalists of color, or queer scholars, to educate the field and commentate controversies. How can we as medievalists respond to such labor conditions with tactics of solidarity, mutual aid, and practical awareness? Panelists are encouraged to explore how labor conditions affect the field of medieval studies and how one might respond best to those conditions. Keywords: labor, justice, recognition, solidarity, work, precarity. Julie Orlemanski