Session Title

Reassessing the Matter of the Greenwood

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Association for Robin Hood Studies (IARHS)

Organizer Name

Alexander L. Kaufman

Organizer Affiliation

Ball State Univ.

Presider Name

Alexander L. Kaufman

Paper Title 1

Transforming the Greenwood: Robyn and Gandelyn as a Catalyst for Change

Presenter 1 Name

Valerie B. Johnson

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Montevallo

Paper Title 2

Gawain in the Greenwood

Presenter 2 Name

Kristin Bovaird-Abbo

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Northern Colorado

Paper Title 3

Global Robins, Global Greenwoods

Presenter 3 Name

Richard Utz

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Georgia Institute of Technology

Start Date

8-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1135

Description

Historian Maurice Keen’s study The Outlaws of Medieval Legend, first published in 1961, remains a significant contribution to outlaw studies. After noticing a number of shared themes, motifs, and styles in medieval outlaw narratives, Keen argued for a new fourth “matter” to join those of Britain, France, and Troy: the greenwood. It is time for a reassessment of his contribution. What are the significant characteristics of a text needed to classify it as a greenwood matter? Can medieval outlaw works exist as hybrid matters? How can we account for medieval and post-medieval matters of the greenwood outside of medieval Western Europe? Alexander L. Kaufman

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May 8th, 10:00 AM

Reassessing the Matter of the Greenwood

Schneider 1135

Historian Maurice Keen’s study The Outlaws of Medieval Legend, first published in 1961, remains a significant contribution to outlaw studies. After noticing a number of shared themes, motifs, and styles in medieval outlaw narratives, Keen argued for a new fourth “matter” to join those of Britain, France, and Troy: the greenwood. It is time for a reassessment of his contribution. What are the significant characteristics of a text needed to classify it as a greenwood matter? Can medieval outlaw works exist as hybrid matters? How can we account for medieval and post-medieval matters of the greenwood outside of medieval Western Europe? Alexander L. Kaufman