Session Title

Archaizing Form: Rolls and Beyond

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Digital Editing and the Medieval Manuscript: Rolls and Fragments (DEMMR/F)

Organizer Name

Mireille J. Pardon

Organizer Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Presider Name

Mireille J. Pardon

Paper Title 1

Old Rolls, New Lengths

Presenter 1 Name

Katherine S. Hindley

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Nanyang Technological Univ.

Paper Title 2

This Is Not a Roll: The Hohenburg Flabellum as a Ritual Object in Parchment

Presenter 2 Name

Kristina Potuckova

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 3

Inventing Authority: Performing the Medieval Roll from the Annunciation to the Contract

Presenter 3 Name

Raymond Clemens

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 212

Description

It is often suggested that the manuscript roll carries connotations of tradition, antiquity, and solemnity, explaining its use in liturgical and ceremonial settings. However, the horizontal orientation of the ancient scroll is strikingly different from the vertical orientation of most medieval rolls. What, then, is the relationship between the medieval roll form and antiquity? How did medieval scribes and readers construct and respond to past book-making traditions? How did artists, illuminators and writers imagine and reimagine the roll when depicting ancient writing materials? Thinking beyond the roll, how and when did scribes disguise or emphasize later additions to earlier manuscripts?

This panel invites papers that explore and interrogate the connections between the material form of a text and the idea of antiquity, particularly in relation to rolls and other non-codex forms, such as wax-tablets or papyrus bulls. Mireille Pardon

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May 8th, 10:00 AM

Archaizing Form: Rolls and Beyond

Bernhard 212

It is often suggested that the manuscript roll carries connotations of tradition, antiquity, and solemnity, explaining its use in liturgical and ceremonial settings. However, the horizontal orientation of the ancient scroll is strikingly different from the vertical orientation of most medieval rolls. What, then, is the relationship between the medieval roll form and antiquity? How did medieval scribes and readers construct and respond to past book-making traditions? How did artists, illuminators and writers imagine and reimagine the roll when depicting ancient writing materials? Thinking beyond the roll, how and when did scribes disguise or emphasize later additions to earlier manuscripts?

This panel invites papers that explore and interrogate the connections between the material form of a text and the idea of antiquity, particularly in relation to rolls and other non-codex forms, such as wax-tablets or papyrus bulls. Mireille Pardon