Session Title

Intangible Cultural Heritage and the Global Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Rebecca E. Straple

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Rebecca E. Straple

Paper Title 1

Contact: The Importance of Other Cultures at Norse/Viking Interpretive Sites

Presenter 1 Name

Megan Arnott

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Paper Title 2

Cultural Heritage of Mental Disability

Presenter 2 Name

Kisha G. Tracy

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Fitchburg State Univ.

Paper Title 3

A Universal Living Tradition of Acanthus-Arabesque Ornamentation in Christian, Islamic, and Hindu-Buddhist Religious Spaces

Presenter 3 Name

Hee Sook Lee-Niinioja

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Conseil international des monuments et des sites (ICOMOS)

Start Date

8-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1340

Description

The UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) was adopted in 2003 and defines ICH as "the practices, representations, expressions, knowledge, and skills—as well as the instruments, objects, artifacts, and cultural spaces associated therewith—that communities, groups, and…individuals recognize as part of their cultural heritage." Examples include rituals, language, performance, social practices, traditional craftsmanship, food heritage, dance, and more—ephemeral practices, often transmitted orally and through the body rather than codified and recorded in material artifacts or literary records. The Convention was adopted largely in response to the frustrations of non-Western countries that argued their cultures were not expressed in the “heritage” sites celebrated by UNESCO’s World Heritage List, but through ephemeral and intangible practices. Similarly, Western medieval scholarship has often focused on the relatively small region of Western Europe and a relatively limited range of sources and artifacts. This panel features papers on medieval intangible cultural heritage, particularly from regions outside of Western Europe, or that were affected by interactions of medieval people from within and without Western Europe.

Rebecca Straple

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May 8th, 10:00 AM

Intangible Cultural Heritage and the Global Middle Ages

Schneider 1340

The UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) was adopted in 2003 and defines ICH as "the practices, representations, expressions, knowledge, and skills—as well as the instruments, objects, artifacts, and cultural spaces associated therewith—that communities, groups, and…individuals recognize as part of their cultural heritage." Examples include rituals, language, performance, social practices, traditional craftsmanship, food heritage, dance, and more—ephemeral practices, often transmitted orally and through the body rather than codified and recorded in material artifacts or literary records. The Convention was adopted largely in response to the frustrations of non-Western countries that argued their cultures were not expressed in the “heritage” sites celebrated by UNESCO’s World Heritage List, but through ephemeral and intangible practices. Similarly, Western medieval scholarship has often focused on the relatively small region of Western Europe and a relatively limited range of sources and artifacts. This panel features papers on medieval intangible cultural heritage, particularly from regions outside of Western Europe, or that were affected by interactions of medieval people from within and without Western Europe.

Rebecca Straple