Session Title

Women's Networks in the Early Medieval North Atlantic

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Feminist Renaissance in Early Medieval English Studies (FREMES)

Organizer Name

Erin E. Sweany; Rebecca E. Straple

Organizer Affiliation

Vassar College; Western Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Erin E. Sweany

Paper Title 1

From Chelles to Kent: Networks of Scribal Practice among Women

Presenter 1 Name

Elizabeth Matresse

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Paper Title 2

Aelfgifu and the North Atlantic: A Queen for All Kingdoms

Presenter 2 Name

Mae T. Kilker

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 3

Writing to/from Early Medieval Women

Presenter 3 Name

Erica Weaver

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Los Angeles

Paper Title 4

Women in Context: Modeling Patronage in the Encomium Emmae reginae

Presenter 4 Name

Emily Butler

Presenter 4 Affiliation

John Carroll Univ.

Start Date

7-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

This session, sponsored by A Feminist Renaissance in Early English Medieval Studies, examines the roles of women, their writing, and their influence in the formation and cultivation of cultural networks in the early medieval North Atlantic. Women were powerful agents of political, cultural, and religious connections in the Middle Ages, and thus medieval networks were dependent upon women. Looking at cultural networks in terms of the women involved in them thus allows for the study of a wide range of topics that engage with gender and sex.

This panel is particularly, although not exclusively, interested in studies that engage with women’s networks in an expansive global North Atlantic. “North Atlantic” is a term that has primarily served as a shorthand for England, Ireland, and Scandinavia but, if geography is closely attended to, could facilitate the study of connections between England, Ireland, Scandinavia, Iberia, North Africa, and even North and Central America. In a forthcoming article, Nahir I. Otaño Gracia argues for a Global North Atlantic Studies that decenters Europe by researching and acknowledging the cultural influence exerted on the cultures of the traditional North Atlantic by Africa, the Islamicate, the Iberian peninsula, and “even the Americas.”1

Studying early medieval women as connected and as connections within and between cultures, potentially (but not necessarily) supplemented by a geographically realistic understanding of the term “North Atlantic,” can facilitate better models of a networked early Middle Ages.

1. Otaño Gracia, Nahir I. “Towards a Decentered North Atlantic: Blackness in Saga af Tristram ok Ísodd.” Literature Compass. Forthcoming.

Rebecca Straple

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May 7th, 1:30 PM

Women's Networks in the Early Medieval North Atlantic

Fetzer 2030

This session, sponsored by A Feminist Renaissance in Early English Medieval Studies, examines the roles of women, their writing, and their influence in the formation and cultivation of cultural networks in the early medieval North Atlantic. Women were powerful agents of political, cultural, and religious connections in the Middle Ages, and thus medieval networks were dependent upon women. Looking at cultural networks in terms of the women involved in them thus allows for the study of a wide range of topics that engage with gender and sex.

This panel is particularly, although not exclusively, interested in studies that engage with women’s networks in an expansive global North Atlantic. “North Atlantic” is a term that has primarily served as a shorthand for England, Ireland, and Scandinavia but, if geography is closely attended to, could facilitate the study of connections between England, Ireland, Scandinavia, Iberia, North Africa, and even North and Central America. In a forthcoming article, Nahir I. Otaño Gracia argues for a Global North Atlantic Studies that decenters Europe by researching and acknowledging the cultural influence exerted on the cultures of the traditional North Atlantic by Africa, the Islamicate, the Iberian peninsula, and “even the Americas.”1

Studying early medieval women as connected and as connections within and between cultures, potentially (but not necessarily) supplemented by a geographically realistic understanding of the term “North Atlantic,” can facilitate better models of a networked early Middle Ages.

1. Otaño Gracia, Nahir I. “Towards a Decentered North Atlantic: Blackness in Saga af Tristram ok Ísodd.” Literature Compass. Forthcoming.

Rebecca Straple