Session Title

Medieval Urbanism: New Archaeological Research II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Pam J. Crabtree

Organizer Affiliation

New York Univ.

Presider Name

Taylor Zaneri

Presider Affiliation

Univ. van Amsterdam

Paper Title 1

Recreating the Medieval Urban Diet through Experimental Archaeology

Presenter 1 Name

Scott D. Stull

Presenter 1 Affiliation

SUNY-Cortland

Paper Title 2

Urban Analysis as a Methodology for Archaeological Studies: The Specific Case of Badajoz, Spain

Presenter 2 Name

Rodrigo O. Tirado

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia

Paper Title 3

Feeding Early Medieval Antwerp: Zoological Evidence from the Burcht and Gorterstraat Sites

Presenter 3 Name

Pam J. Crabtree

Paper Title 4

Understanding the "Place"-ing of SItes in the Vézère Valle (Dordogne, France) during the Early Medieval Period

Presenter 4 Name

Zenobie S. Garrett

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Oklahoma

Start Date

10-5-2020 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 209

Description

The origins and development of medieval towns have been of interest to both archaeologists and historians since the days of Henri Pirenne. Damage that resulted from the Second World War opened by centers of medieval towns such as London, Southampton and Cologne for the first time, and the urban redevelopment that has taken place over the past 50 years has contributed to our understanding of the origins and growth of medieval towns and cities. In the 21st century, new methods of archaeological research such as GIS (Geographical Information Systems), soil micromorphology, and advances in the analysis of ceramic, floral, human skeletal, and faunal materials have transformed our understanding of urban medieval society. These two sessions will provide case studies of the ways in which new archaeological techniques have contributed to our knowledge of development of and daily life within European medieval towns. This session focuses primarily on new methodological approaches.

Pam Crabtree

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May 10th, 10:30 AM

Medieval Urbanism: New Archaeological Research II

Bernhard 209

The origins and development of medieval towns have been of interest to both archaeologists and historians since the days of Henri Pirenne. Damage that resulted from the Second World War opened by centers of medieval towns such as London, Southampton and Cologne for the first time, and the urban redevelopment that has taken place over the past 50 years has contributed to our understanding of the origins and growth of medieval towns and cities. In the 21st century, new methods of archaeological research such as GIS (Geographical Information Systems), soil micromorphology, and advances in the analysis of ceramic, floral, human skeletal, and faunal materials have transformed our understanding of urban medieval society. These two sessions will provide case studies of the ways in which new archaeological techniques have contributed to our knowledge of development of and daily life within European medieval towns. This session focuses primarily on new methodological approaches.

Pam Crabtree