Session Title

Centers, Peripheries, and Networks of Reform in the Fifteenth Century

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Jean Gerson Society; Lollard Society

Organizer Name

Michael Van Dussen; Matthew Vanderpoel

Organizer Affiliation

McGill Univ.; Univ. of Chicago

Presider Name

Michael Van Dussen

Paper Title 1

Jakoubek of Stříbro and the Donatists

Presenter 1 Name

Stephen E. Lahey

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln

Paper Title 2

Come Back to the Roman Side, We Have Indulgences: Enacting Reform in Fifteenth-Century Bohemia

Presenter 2 Name

Jan Volek

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Paper Title 3

Negotiating Religious Peace: The Peace of Kutná Hora as Hopeful Solution to a Half Century of Conflict

Presenter 3 Name

Lisa Scott

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

7-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

This session analyzes reformist ideas and voices as they took shape in the fifteenth century, with an emphasis on the transnational contours of these movements. Calls for reform by the Wycliffites and Hussites spread side by side with those in more familiar mendicant, monastic, or university contexts. This session considers how reform movements or programs were inflected by these networks that traversed political and institutional boundaries. Papers may address the place of universities, the reception of specific intellectuals, patronage networks in the development of reform programs, or variable regional dynamics in reform movements, particularly as they responded to fifteenth-century exigencies. Michael Van Dussen

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May 7th, 1:30 PM

Centers, Peripheries, and Networks of Reform in the Fifteenth Century

Bernhard 210

This session analyzes reformist ideas and voices as they took shape in the fifteenth century, with an emphasis on the transnational contours of these movements. Calls for reform by the Wycliffites and Hussites spread side by side with those in more familiar mendicant, monastic, or university contexts. This session considers how reform movements or programs were inflected by these networks that traversed political and institutional boundaries. Papers may address the place of universities, the reception of specific intellectuals, patronage networks in the development of reform programs, or variable regional dynamics in reform movements, particularly as they responded to fifteenth-century exigencies. Michael Van Dussen