Session Title

Paranormal Encounters in the Medieval North

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Háskóli Íslands; Icelandic Research Fund; Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University

Organizer Name

Miriam Mayburd

Organizer Affiliation

Háskóli Íslands

Presider Name

Melissa A. Mayus

Presider Affiliation

Trine Univ.

Paper Title 1

Speaking with the Dead in the Íslendingasögur

Presenter 1 Name

Elizabeth Skuthorpe

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. de Genève

Paper Title 2

Gender and Magic in the Meykongr Sagas

Presenter 2 Name

Kersti Francis

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Los Angeles

Paper Title 3

Revisiting Bergbúar in Medieval Icelandic Folklore

Presenter 3 Name

Miriam Mayburd

Start Date

7-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1245

Description

This session focuses on literary constructions, narrations, and depictions of otherworldly,other-than-human, and otherwise ambiguous figures associated with paranormal phenomena across medieval Scandinavia, inviting new critical approaches and creative re-interpretations. We especially welcome perspectives from ecocriticism, new materialism, object-oriented-ontology, and other rogue offshoots of contemporary critical theory to problematize how the very methodologies chosen for analyses tend to shape the interpretative results they yield. Paranormal phenomena become auspicious sites for interrogating what, then, was considered normal in premodern North, exposing socio-historical contingencies of the very concept of normativity. Miriam Mayburd

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May 7th, 3:30 PM

Paranormal Encounters in the Medieval North

Schneider 1245

This session focuses on literary constructions, narrations, and depictions of otherworldly,other-than-human, and otherwise ambiguous figures associated with paranormal phenomena across medieval Scandinavia, inviting new critical approaches and creative re-interpretations. We especially welcome perspectives from ecocriticism, new materialism, object-oriented-ontology, and other rogue offshoots of contemporary critical theory to problematize how the very methodologies chosen for analyses tend to shape the interpretative results they yield. Paranormal phenomena become auspicious sites for interrogating what, then, was considered normal in premodern North, exposing socio-historical contingencies of the very concept of normativity. Miriam Mayburd