Session Title

Medieval Representations of Scholarly Labor

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Studies Program, Yale Univ.

Organizer Name

Rachel A. Wilson; Carson J. Koepke

Organizer Affiliation

Yale Univ.; Yale Univ.

Presider Name

Rachel A. Wilson

Paper Title 1

"Scholars are the Inheritors of the Prophets": Unlearnable Lessons from the Lives of the Scholars

Presenter 1 Name

Sherif Abdelkarim

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Grinnell College

Paper Title 2

Readers as Scholars: Learning and Seeing in French and English Thirteenth- and Early Fourteenth-Century Manuscripts

Presenter 2 Name

Roisin Astell

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Kent

Paper Title 3

Hoccleve's Series and the Late Medieval Compilation Narrative

Presenter 3 Name

John Hertz

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Boston Univ.

Start Date

7-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1355

Description

From the Codex Amiatinus’s depiction of Ezra writing in a book to that of Hildegard of Bingen receiving and dictating her supernatural visions in the frontispiece to the Scivias, interest in representing the labors of scholars spanned the length of the Middle Ages. Not only do depictions of scholarly labor such as these, whether visual or textual, shed light onto the material culture and historical practices of medieval scholarship, but they also reveal the ways in which medieval artists and writers sought to convey ideas about the work that they themselves performed and the functions they served in society.

Carson J. Koepke

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May 7th, 10:00 AM

Medieval Representations of Scholarly Labor

Schneider 1355

From the Codex Amiatinus’s depiction of Ezra writing in a book to that of Hildegard of Bingen receiving and dictating her supernatural visions in the frontispiece to the Scivias, interest in representing the labors of scholars spanned the length of the Middle Ages. Not only do depictions of scholarly labor such as these, whether visual or textual, shed light onto the material culture and historical practices of medieval scholarship, but they also reveal the ways in which medieval artists and writers sought to convey ideas about the work that they themselves performed and the functions they served in society.

Carson J. Koepke