Session Title

Tolkien's Paratexts, Appendices, Annals, and Marginalia (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Tolkien at Kalamazoo

Organizer Name

Christopher Vaccaro

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Vermont

Presider Name

Kristine Larsen

Presider Affiliation

Central Connecticut State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Materiality in Tolkien's Medievalism: The Production of Secondary Manuscript Traditions

Presenter 1 Name

Brad Eden

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 2

A Letter To a Friend: The "King's Letter" as Para-text in The Lord of the Rings

Presenter 2 Name

Andrew Higgins

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 3

Finding and Organizing Tolkien's Invented Langauges

Presenter 3 Name

Eileen Marie Moore

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Cleveland State Univ.

Paper Title 4

Do Young Readers Care What Authors, Editors, or Publishers Think? Young Readers’ Engagement with Paratext and Epitexts of Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings?

Presenter 4 Name

Luke Shelton

Presenter 4 Affiliation

East Tennessee State Univ.

Paper Title 5

The Things He Left Behind: Signatures, Marginalia, and Ephemera in Tolkien's Irish Library

Presenter 5 Name

Kristine A. Swank

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Glasgow

Start Date

9-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 208

Description

Following the medieval manuscript tradition, Tolkien’s literary fiction includes charts, maps, annals and other paratextual elements, many found in the Appendices. These elements deserve further critical study. Taking his father’s lead, Christopher Tolkien has been meticulously editing John Ronald Tolkien’s manuscripts, supplying commentary and emendations concerning the many cruces within the notes and typescripts. As medievalists, we will bring this often ignored back matter and marginalia to the foreground. Christopher Vaccaro

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Tolkien's Paratexts, Appendices, Annals, and Marginalia (A Roundtable)

Bernhard 208

Following the medieval manuscript tradition, Tolkien’s literary fiction includes charts, maps, annals and other paratextual elements, many found in the Appendices. These elements deserve further critical study. Taking his father’s lead, Christopher Tolkien has been meticulously editing John Ronald Tolkien’s manuscripts, supplying commentary and emendations concerning the many cruces within the notes and typescripts. As medievalists, we will bring this often ignored back matter and marginalia to the foreground. Christopher Vaccaro