Session Title

Voice in Medieval Occitania

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Société Guilhem IX

Organizer Name

Mary Franklin-Brown

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Cambridge

Presider Name

Courtney Joseph Wells

Presider Affiliation

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Paper Title 1

Whose Voice Issues a "Sumptuary Law"? The Capitouls of Montauban versus Philip III of France, 1275

Presenter 1 Name

Sarah-Grace Heller

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Voice and Death in Medieval Occitan Literature

Presenter 2 Name

Lisa Shugert Bevevino

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Morris

Paper Title 3

Immaterial Materiality: Embodied Voice in the Troubadour Tornada

Presenter 3 Name

Anne Levitsky

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Paper Title 4

The Embodied Voices of Flamenca

Presenter 4 Name

Mary Franklin-Brown

Start Date

7-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 209

Description

The voice, object of discussion by medieval grammarians, has recently been re-examined by a range of critical thinkers. For example, Adriana Cavarero has shown how the uniqueness of a voice, produced by a unique body and entering into dialogue with other unique voices, invites a new understanding of political speech. Mladen Dolar has distinguished the voice from either the conveyance of meaning or the object of aesthetic contemplation, making it a particular kind of surplus, and Giorgio Agamben has distinguished the voice from language and examined the space between them. This session will consider the implications of these and other arguments about voice for the study of medieval Occitania (i.e., the south of what is now France, where Occitan was the medieval vernacular), and, conversely, the implications of medieval Occitan culture for the theoretical examination of voice. Mary Franklin-Brown

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May 7th, 1:30 PM

Voice in Medieval Occitania

Bernhard 209

The voice, object of discussion by medieval grammarians, has recently been re-examined by a range of critical thinkers. For example, Adriana Cavarero has shown how the uniqueness of a voice, produced by a unique body and entering into dialogue with other unique voices, invites a new understanding of political speech. Mladen Dolar has distinguished the voice from either the conveyance of meaning or the object of aesthetic contemplation, making it a particular kind of surplus, and Giorgio Agamben has distinguished the voice from language and examined the space between them. This session will consider the implications of these and other arguments about voice for the study of medieval Occitania (i.e., the south of what is now France, where Occitan was the medieval vernacular), and, conversely, the implications of medieval Occitan culture for the theoretical examination of voice. Mary Franklin-Brown