Session Title

Spain As Egypt's Alternative: Impacts and Influences of Translated Magical Texts

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Ibero-Medieval Association of North America (IMANA); Societas Magica

Organizer Name

Veronica Menaldi

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Mississippi

Presider Name

Edgar W. Francis IV

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

Paper Title 1

Medieval Image Magic: Do We Need It, and Is There a Corpus?

Presenter 1 Name

Lauri Ockenström

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Jyväskylän Yliopisto

Paper Title 2

"Mercurio sacó el su alfange": Arab Hermetic Sources, Liberal Arts, and Adab to Illustrate Ovid's Metamorphoses in Alfonso X’s General estoria

Presenter 2 Name

Juan Udaondo Alegre

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Pennsylvania State Univ.

Paper Title 3

Toledean Translations and Their Continued Influence on Iberian Literature: The Case of the Enchanted Isles in the Libro del caballero Zifar

Presenter 3 Name

Veronica Menaldi

Paper Title 4

Decrypting the Symbol: Prophets as (Proto)linguists in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

Presenter 4 Name

Alberto Gelmi

Presenter 4 Affiliation

CUNY

Start Date

7-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1060

Description

The twelfth/thirteenth centuries gave Mediterranean Arabic magical and astronomical knowledge a new life in Western Christendom. Many hired Jews under clerical and royal patronage in the Toledo School of Translators translated these, often Aristotelian or Hermetic, texts into Latin and Castilian. While Egypt remained a predominant magical hub, Spain quickly rose as an alternative attracting many new students, so to speak, who could either more easily travel southwest or had limited to no Arabic linguistic skills. In part due to these translations, Spain became an intermediary of knowledge transmission and integral part of both Mediterranean and European networks. David Porreca

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 7th, 1:30 PM

Spain As Egypt's Alternative: Impacts and Influences of Translated Magical Texts

Fetzer 1060

The twelfth/thirteenth centuries gave Mediterranean Arabic magical and astronomical knowledge a new life in Western Christendom. Many hired Jews under clerical and royal patronage in the Toledo School of Translators translated these, often Aristotelian or Hermetic, texts into Latin and Castilian. While Egypt remained a predominant magical hub, Spain quickly rose as an alternative attracting many new students, so to speak, who could either more easily travel southwest or had limited to no Arabic linguistic skills. In part due to these translations, Spain became an intermediary of knowledge transmission and integral part of both Mediterranean and European networks. David Porreca