Session Title

Psychoactive Ingredients and Intoxication in Medieval Magic

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Societas Magica

Organizer Name

Liana Saif

Organizer Affiliation

Warburg Institute

Presider Name

David Porreca

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Waterloo

Paper Title 1

The Bewitching Bufonid: Venoms and Hallucinogens of the Common Toad (Bufo Bufo)

Presenter 1 Name

Rochelle Rojas

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Kalamazoo College

Paper Title 2

Bitter Poison Mixed in with Sweet Words: Psychoactive Substances and Offensive Operations in Picatrix

Presenter 2 Name

Daniel Attrell

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Waterloo

Paper Title 3

"Drugs" in Medieval Islamic Magic

Presenter 3 Name

Liana Saif

Start Date

8-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1730

Description

Studies of medieval magic have largely focused on the legitimacy and genealogies of magical theories and practices, and questions of textual and contextual coherence. This session will highlight “microscopic” elements of magical practice; namely, psychoactive ingredients and intoxicants, with the aim to understand the place of these substances in scientific and religious discourses through the study of magical texts, which are situated at the intersection of these “macroscopic” discourses. Engaging in a discussion about mind-altering substances in medieval magic fits within a growing academic engagement with the subject of psychedelics in the sciences and humanities. David Porreca

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May 8th, 1:30 PM

Psychoactive Ingredients and Intoxication in Medieval Magic

Sangren 1730

Studies of medieval magic have largely focused on the legitimacy and genealogies of magical theories and practices, and questions of textual and contextual coherence. This session will highlight “microscopic” elements of magical practice; namely, psychoactive ingredients and intoxicants, with the aim to understand the place of these substances in scientific and religious discourses through the study of magical texts, which are situated at the intersection of these “macroscopic” discourses. Engaging in a discussion about mind-altering substances in medieval magic fits within a growing academic engagement with the subject of psychedelics in the sciences and humanities. David Porreca