Session Title

Cave Architecture and Art in the Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Maria Harvey

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Cambridge

Presider Name

Maria Harvey

Paper Title 1

The Medieval City of Ani: Above and Underground

Presenter 1 Name

Atineh Movsesian

Presenter 1 Affiliation

California State Polytechnic Univ.-Pomona

Paper Title 2

Visualizing the Architectural Space of the Hermit's Cave in Early Medieval Ireland and Britain

Presenter 2 Name

Colleen M. Thomas

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. College Dublin

Paper Title 3

Mediterranean Horizons and Underground Spaces in Medieval Sicily: The Crypt of the Cathedral of Catania and the Crypt of San Marciano in Syracuse

Presenter 3 Name

Giulia Arcidiacono (Congress Travel Award Winner); Tancredi Bella (Congress Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. degli Studi di Catania; Univ. degli Studi di Catania

Start Date

7-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1245

Description

Cave churches, monasteries and dwellings can be admired throughout the Mediterranean and Western Europe, where they often appear next to and even intertwined with the built environment. With notable exceptions in Cappadocia and Ethiopia, caves structures are often dismissed because of their small size and simplicity. However, caves and other underground spaces played essential roles in medieval cultures, as demonstrated by their mural decorations and how they appear in hagiographies, pilgrimage accounts and other genres of literature. The three papers in this session will focus on Ani in Armenia; Catania and Syracuse in Sicily and on Ireland, demonstrating the importance that cave structures have played in the environment and in the imagination of the Middle Ages.

Maria Harvey

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May 7th, 10:00 AM

Cave Architecture and Art in the Middle Ages

Schneider 1245

Cave churches, monasteries and dwellings can be admired throughout the Mediterranean and Western Europe, where they often appear next to and even intertwined with the built environment. With notable exceptions in Cappadocia and Ethiopia, caves structures are often dismissed because of their small size and simplicity. However, caves and other underground spaces played essential roles in medieval cultures, as demonstrated by their mural decorations and how they appear in hagiographies, pilgrimage accounts and other genres of literature. The three papers in this session will focus on Ani in Armenia; Catania and Syracuse in Sicily and on Ireland, demonstrating the importance that cave structures have played in the environment and in the imagination of the Middle Ages.

Maria Harvey