Session Title

From the Sanctuary to the Museum: Displaying the Sacred

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Lena Liepe

Organizer Affiliation

Linnéuniv.

Presider Name

Lena Liepe

Paper Title 1

To the Museum and Back Again: Transports and Transformations of the Medieval Wooden Sculpture from Hollola Church in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Presenter 1 Name

Katri Vuola (Gründler Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Helsingin Yliopisto

Paper Title 2

A Museum and a Place of Worship: How the Middle Ages Reemerged in Swedish Churches in the Early Twentieth Century

Presenter 2 Name

Henrik Widmark

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Uppsala Univ.

Paper Title 3

Reanimating Saint Anne: Discourses on a Late Medieval Polychrome Sculpture in the Exhibition Transformation

Presenter 3 Name

Noëlle Lynn Wenger Streeton

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. i Oslo

Start Date

8-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1750

Description

The papers in this session explore the display of medieval church art in late time settings. What happens to the identity and integrity of a church object when it is transferred from the sanctuary to the museum gallery? To what extent can/should the museum evoke elements of the enchantment that once surrounded the religious object in its original context? And not least interesting, what are the consequences when an ancient art work, as it sometimes happens, is retrieved by the congregation of the church it once belonged to and put back into the church. Does the object somehow regain its hallowed status, or is it still a museum piece – and what are the considerations of the agents involved on issues such as these?

Lena Liepe

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May 8th, 1:30 PM

From the Sanctuary to the Museum: Displaying the Sacred

Sangren 1750

The papers in this session explore the display of medieval church art in late time settings. What happens to the identity and integrity of a church object when it is transferred from the sanctuary to the museum gallery? To what extent can/should the museum evoke elements of the enchantment that once surrounded the religious object in its original context? And not least interesting, what are the consequences when an ancient art work, as it sometimes happens, is retrieved by the congregation of the church it once belonged to and put back into the church. Does the object somehow regain its hallowed status, or is it still a museum piece – and what are the considerations of the agents involved on issues such as these?

Lena Liepe