Session Title

Reproductive Cultures: New Approaches to the Facsimile

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Sigrid Danielson

Organizer Affiliation

Grand Valley State Univ.

Presider Name

Evan A. Gatti

Presider Affiliation

Elon Univ.

Paper Title 1

Plaster Casts in and out of Favor (and Storage)

Presenter 1 Name

Martha Easton

Presenter 1 Affiliation

St. Joseph's Univ.

Paper Title 2

"Even Better Than the Real Thing": Experiencing Authenticity with Manuscript Facsimiles

Presenter 2 Name

Jennifer Borland

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Oklahoma State Univ./Material Collective

Paper Title 3

Carl Nordenfalk's Color of the Middle Ages (1976) and the Pittsburgh Facsimiles Today

Presenter 3 Name

Shirin A. Fozi; Kiana Jones

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Pittsburgh; Univ. of Pittsburgh

Paper Title 4

On the Cost of Facsimiles: Why Are Modern-Day Replicas So Necessary, yet So Hardly Accessible?

Presenter 4 Name

Giovanni Scorcioni

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Quires SRL (DBA Facsimile Finder)

Start Date

7-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 2355

Description

The place of facsimiles in recording, preserving, as well as conveying medieval visual and material culture has a complicated relationship with art history and related fields. These likenesses offer tools for study and reflection, as well as material and digital experiences. The time has come to revisit their significance in shaping medieval studies. Facsimiles hold promise for research, access, and collaboration, even as their cost privilege (again) institutions with budgets that can afford to purchase them. In contrast, likenesses available in digital form or circulated as souvenirs and mementos provide greater access but frequently differ from their models with respect to physical characteristics. Facsimiles warrant innovative examination to move beyond the characterization of them as equivocal substitutions for medieval manuscripts and sculpted works. The contexts for the production and use of these works are diverse. How can phenomenology and material culture studies provide new venues to address the relationship between “original” and “copy” as well as history and the present?

Sigrid K. Danielson

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May 7th, 3:30 PM

Reproductive Cultures: New Approaches to the Facsimile

Schneider 2355

The place of facsimiles in recording, preserving, as well as conveying medieval visual and material culture has a complicated relationship with art history and related fields. These likenesses offer tools for study and reflection, as well as material and digital experiences. The time has come to revisit their significance in shaping medieval studies. Facsimiles hold promise for research, access, and collaboration, even as their cost privilege (again) institutions with budgets that can afford to purchase them. In contrast, likenesses available in digital form or circulated as souvenirs and mementos provide greater access but frequently differ from their models with respect to physical characteristics. Facsimiles warrant innovative examination to move beyond the characterization of them as equivocal substitutions for medieval manuscripts and sculpted works. The contexts for the production and use of these works are diverse. How can phenomenology and material culture studies provide new venues to address the relationship between “original” and “copy” as well as history and the present?

Sigrid K. Danielson