Session Title

From History to My-Story: Affirming the Self in Medieval Chronicles

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Univ. of Oklahoma

Organizer Name

Roberto Pesce

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Oklahoma

Presider Name

Annie T. Doucet

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Oklahoma

Paper Title 1

The French Medieval Historian’s Persona: From Narrative Device to Self-Narrative

Presenter 1 Name

Cristian M. Bratu

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Baylor Univ.

Paper Title 2

Late Medieval Empiricism and William of Worcestre's Persona in His Itineraries

Presenter 2 Name

Matthew Boyd Goldie

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Rider Univ.

Paper Title 3

From Annals to Journal: The Author in Northern Italian Chronicles

Presenter 3 Name

Roberto Pesce

Start Date

7-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1325

Description

In his famous definition of chronicles, Gervase of Canterbury notes that chronicles and histories were meant to be objective texts written in the third person in which historians were supposed to be mere mirrors of historical “reality.” Nevertheless, in many medieval texts, the “I” seems to crave to express itself in the first person singular. The author turns the mirror toward himself or herself and, as a result, history becomes my-story, thus turning medieval chronicles into journals that offer a more personal perspective on human history. This panel focuses on the transition from medieval annals and chronicles to more personal texts in which the writer, abandoning anonymity, expresses and includes the self in his or her works. Roberto Pesce

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May 7th, 10:00 AM

From History to My-Story: Affirming the Self in Medieval Chronicles

Schneider 1325

In his famous definition of chronicles, Gervase of Canterbury notes that chronicles and histories were meant to be objective texts written in the third person in which historians were supposed to be mere mirrors of historical “reality.” Nevertheless, in many medieval texts, the “I” seems to crave to express itself in the first person singular. The author turns the mirror toward himself or herself and, as a result, history becomes my-story, thus turning medieval chronicles into journals that offer a more personal perspective on human history. This panel focuses on the transition from medieval annals and chronicles to more personal texts in which the writer, abandoning anonymity, expresses and includes the self in his or her works. Roberto Pesce