Session Title

Subjects of Violence: Women, Resistance, and Consent in Medieval Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Elizaveta Strakhov

Organizer Affiliation

Marquette Univ.

Presider Name

Sarah Baechle

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Mississippi

Paper Title 1

"You and Me, Baby, Ain’t Nothin' But Mammals": Animal Nature and Sexual Violence in the Poetry of William Dunbar

Presenter 1 Name

Mary C. Flannery

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. Bern

Paper Title 2

Critiquing Rape Culture in Saint Winifred's Passion

Presenter 2 Name

Courtney E. Rydel

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Washington College

Paper Title 3

"And sok his fille of þat licour": Maternity, Sovereignty, and Consent in the Marian Lyrics of MS Sloane 2593

Presenter 3 Name

Katharine W. Jager

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Houston-Downtown

Start Date

10-5-2020 10:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2040

Description

In the wake of the #metoo movement, medieval studies has fruitfully taken back up the subjects of rape culture, consent, and feminist approaches to the Middle Ages, particularly in Middle English literature and studies of Chaucer’s biography. This session explores the duality of medieval literature about rape and consent: it can challenge patriarchal hegemonies and offer victims a voice. Yet, representations of female subjectivity and victimization—especially when male-authored—can also exploit female pain as spectacle and instead assert patriarchal dominance. This panel illuminates the nuances of this duality and enunciates strategies for its ethical treatment in scholarship.

Elizaveta Strakhov

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May 10th, 10:30 AM

Subjects of Violence: Women, Resistance, and Consent in Medieval Literature

Fetzer 2040

In the wake of the #metoo movement, medieval studies has fruitfully taken back up the subjects of rape culture, consent, and feminist approaches to the Middle Ages, particularly in Middle English literature and studies of Chaucer’s biography. This session explores the duality of medieval literature about rape and consent: it can challenge patriarchal hegemonies and offer victims a voice. Yet, representations of female subjectivity and victimization—especially when male-authored—can also exploit female pain as spectacle and instead assert patriarchal dominance. This panel illuminates the nuances of this duality and enunciates strategies for its ethical treatment in scholarship.

Elizaveta Strakhov