Session Title

Treasured Objects from Archive to Altar: The Documentation and Display of Transcultural Networks I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Iberian Treasury in Context: Collections, Connections, and Representations on the Peninsula and Beyond

Organizer Name

Amanda W. Dotseth

Organizer Affiliation

Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist Univ.

Presider Name

Therese Martin

Presider Affiliation

Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

Paper Title 1

Women's Influence, Modern Perceptions, and the Transmission of "Culture" in Medieval Central and Eastern Europe

Presenter 1 Name

Christian Raffensperger

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Wittenberg Univ.

Paper Title 2

Pirates, Corsairs, and Sea Robbers: Cultural Booty and Exchange Networks in Premodern Iberian Literature

Presenter 2 Name

Alex Korte

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Paper Title 3

The Lives of Medieval Textiles in Iberian Treasuries: Macro, Micro, and Public Histories

Presenter 3 Name

María Judith Feliciano

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

8-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1360

Description

This pair of sessions focuses on treasured objects in order to bring transcultural networks to the fore, shining a light on issues of relevance to both scholarship and society today. We address broad socio-cultural questions concerning the role of sumptuary collections as evidence of connections during the central Middle Ages, especially the multiple layers of contacts in medieval Christendom and Islam. The treasury at San Isidoro de León offers a comparative model for reading evidence over time, weighing the sometimes contradictory conclusions from documentary or visual sources against scientific analysis. Issues of display, usage, and audience are analyzed. Amanda W. Dotseth

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May 8th, 1:30 PM

Treasured Objects from Archive to Altar: The Documentation and Display of Transcultural Networks I

Schneider 1360

This pair of sessions focuses on treasured objects in order to bring transcultural networks to the fore, shining a light on issues of relevance to both scholarship and society today. We address broad socio-cultural questions concerning the role of sumptuary collections as evidence of connections during the central Middle Ages, especially the multiple layers of contacts in medieval Christendom and Islam. The treasury at San Isidoro de León offers a comparative model for reading evidence over time, weighing the sometimes contradictory conclusions from documentary or visual sources against scientific analysis. Issues of display, usage, and audience are analyzed. Amanda W. Dotseth