Session Title

Magic, Miracles, and Medicine: Borders of Healing in the Iberian Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Inter-American and Border Studies, Univ. of Texas-El Paso

Organizer Name

Matthew V. Desing

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Texas-El Paso

Presider Name

Robin M. Bower

Presider Affiliation

Pennsylvania State Univ.-Beaver

Paper Title 1

Saintly Intervention or Medicinal Cure: Women and Healing in the Mester de Clerecía

Presenter 1 Name

Matthew V. Desing

Paper Title 2

Death as an End to Suffering: Berceo and the Gift of the Virgin

Presenter 2 Name

Paul E. Larson

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Baylor Univ.

Paper Title 3

Treating the Body and the Soul: Blurring the Border between Morisco Medicine and Magic in Sixteenth-Century Iberia

Presenter 3 Name

Donald W. Wood

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Oklahoma State Univ.

Start Date

7-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Sangren 1320

Description

In the Iberian Middle Ages, the limits between authorized and illicit healing were often subtle. Whether a cure was labeled as medicinal, miraculous, or magical could have deadly consequences for the patient as well as the practitioner. This panel aims to bring together scholars from a variety of subfields including social history, literature, religion, and the history of science/medicine. The importance of this session lies not only in ways that these distinctions were drawn in the Middle Ages, but also in the ways that modern criticism values or neglects these distinctions based on current views of healing. Matthew V. Desing

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May 7th, 10:00 AM

Magic, Miracles, and Medicine: Borders of Healing in the Iberian Middle Ages

Sangren 1320

In the Iberian Middle Ages, the limits between authorized and illicit healing were often subtle. Whether a cure was labeled as medicinal, miraculous, or magical could have deadly consequences for the patient as well as the practitioner. This panel aims to bring together scholars from a variety of subfields including social history, literature, religion, and the history of science/medicine. The importance of this session lies not only in ways that these distinctions were drawn in the Middle Ages, but also in the ways that modern criticism values or neglects these distinctions based on current views of healing. Matthew V. Desing