Session Title

Expanded-Ac and the Medievalist (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge

Organizer Affiliation

Footnoting History

Presider Name

Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge

Paper Title 1

Roundtable Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Joshua P. Hevert

Presenter 1 Affiliation

El Paso Community College

Paper Title 2

Roundtable Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Christine Caccipuoti

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Footnoting History

Paper Title 3

Roundtable Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Valerie Schutte

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 4

Roundtable Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Dayanna Knight

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Viking Coloring Book Project

Start Date

7-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

The term “alt-ac” is often used to describe those employed outside of the traditional professoriate. However, increasing numbers of medievalists are turning to these “alternate” occupations as fewer tenure-track positions are available with each passing term. With initiatives like the MAA’s popping up to support contingent, unaffiliated, and academic-adjacent medievalists, it is time to reframe the discussion. When those who have successfully branched out are given a voice it becomes clear that these occupations are not “alt-ac”, but “expanded-ac”, broadening the reach of academic history through the unique and fulfilling careers held by medievalists who love it.

Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge and Christine J. Caccipuoti

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 7th, 10:00 AM

Expanded-Ac and the Medievalist (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 2030

The term “alt-ac” is often used to describe those employed outside of the traditional professoriate. However, increasing numbers of medievalists are turning to these “alternate” occupations as fewer tenure-track positions are available with each passing term. With initiatives like the MAA’s popping up to support contingent, unaffiliated, and academic-adjacent medievalists, it is time to reframe the discussion. When those who have successfully branched out are given a voice it becomes clear that these occupations are not “alt-ac”, but “expanded-ac”, broadening the reach of academic history through the unique and fulfilling careers held by medievalists who love it.

Elizabeth Keohane-Burbridge and Christine J. Caccipuoti