Session Title

Money, Class, and Materiality in the Fourteenth Century II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

14th Century Society

Organizer Name

Maya Soifer Irish

Organizer Affiliation

Rice Univ.

Presider Name

Diane B. Wolfthal

Presider Affiliation

Rice Univ.

Paper Title 1

"Playing the Lord?": Money, Class, and Materiality in the Manière de langage of 1396

Presenter 1 Name

Ashley Powers

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Ohio Wesleyan Univ.

Paper Title 2

At "Pulteney's Inn": Mayoralty and Materiality in Fourteenth-Century London

Presenter 2 Name

Jack W. McCart

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 3

Respondent

Presenter 3 Name

Craig E. Bertolet

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Auburn Univ.

Start Date

7-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 106

Description

Although medieval studies has recently focused on a range of topics – among them monsters, the posthuman, materiality, and the senses – economic issues have been too often ignored despite the fact that these issues are critical in the larger culture today, from income inequality to taxes and tariffs. Yet with the rise of the monetary economy and consumption cultures, Europeans vigorously debated the ethical use of money and possession of material objects that fed social inequality. Different classes often held divergent views ranging from resistance to the dawn of capitalism, to accommodation of some new commercial practices, to wholehearted support for the new economic changes. Focusing on the fourteenth century, this session welcomes papers that discuss the lively debate that included Franciscans, Scholastics, royalty, and merchants, or that explore different viewpoints in the debate. Maya Soifer Irish

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May 7th, 3:30 PM

Money, Class, and Materiality in the Fourteenth Century II

Bernhard 106

Although medieval studies has recently focused on a range of topics – among them monsters, the posthuman, materiality, and the senses – economic issues have been too often ignored despite the fact that these issues are critical in the larger culture today, from income inequality to taxes and tariffs. Yet with the rise of the monetary economy and consumption cultures, Europeans vigorously debated the ethical use of money and possession of material objects that fed social inequality. Different classes often held divergent views ranging from resistance to the dawn of capitalism, to accommodation of some new commercial practices, to wholehearted support for the new economic changes. Focusing on the fourteenth century, this session welcomes papers that discuss the lively debate that included Franciscans, Scholastics, royalty, and merchants, or that explore different viewpoints in the debate. Maya Soifer Irish