Session Title

Arthurian Literature between Malory and Tennyson

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Arthurian Society, North American Branch (IAS/NAB)

Organizer Name

Christopher Michael Berard

Organizer Affiliation

Providence College

Presider Name

Christopher Michael Berard

Paper Title 1

Singing the King: A Ballad Based on Malory and a Theatrical Hodgepodge Scored by Purcell

Presenter 1 Name

Betsy Bowden

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Rutgers Univ.-Camden

Paper Title 2

Thomas Percy, Arthurian Influencer

Presenter 2 Name

Katie Garner

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of St. Andrews

Paper Title 3

Wordsworth's Arthurian Romance: "The Egyptian Maid"

Presenter 3 Name

Bruce Graver

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Providence College

Start Date

9-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1145

Description

The four centuries between William Caxton’s publication of Sir Thomas Malory’s Morte d’Arthur (1485) and the completion of Alfred Lord Tennyson’s cycle of twelve narrative Arthurian poems, the Idylls of the King (1885), tend to be regarded as ‘an Arthurian nadir’ for English-language Arthurian literature. This panel seeks to foster an exploration of the portrayal of King Arthur within the corpus of ‘lesser’ Arthuriana. Our aim is to promote interest in these oft-forgotten texts and to explore how these treatments of Arthur illuminate post-medieval reception of the history and literature of the Middle Ages more broadly. David F. Johnson

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Arthurian Literature between Malory and Tennyson

Schneider 1145

The four centuries between William Caxton’s publication of Sir Thomas Malory’s Morte d’Arthur (1485) and the completion of Alfred Lord Tennyson’s cycle of twelve narrative Arthurian poems, the Idylls of the King (1885), tend to be regarded as ‘an Arthurian nadir’ for English-language Arthurian literature. This panel seeks to foster an exploration of the portrayal of King Arthur within the corpus of ‘lesser’ Arthuriana. Our aim is to promote interest in these oft-forgotten texts and to explore how these treatments of Arthur illuminate post-medieval reception of the history and literature of the Middle Ages more broadly. David F. Johnson