Session Title

Crises and Continuity: Teaching the End of the Middle Ages (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

14th Century Society

Organizer Name

Maya Soifer Irish

Organizer Affiliation

Rice Univ.

Presider Name

Sarah Ifft Decker

Presider Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 1

Panelist

Presenter 1 Name

Abigail Agresta

Presenter 1 Affiliation

George Washington Univ.

Paper Title 2

Panelist

Presenter 2 Name

Daisy Delogu

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Paper Title 3

Panelist

Presenter 3 Name

Maya Soifer Irish

Paper Title 4

Panelist

Presenter 4 Name

Kyle C. Lincoln

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Paper Title 5

Panelist

Presenter 5 Name

Hollis Shaul

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Miami Univ. of Ohio

Paper Title 6

Panelist

Presenter 6 Name

Bobbi Sutherland

Presenter 6 Affiliation

Univ. of Dayton

Start Date

8-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Description

The idea that the Middle Ages ended in a series of crises – including the Great Famine, the Black Death, the Peasants’ Revolt in England, and the massacres of Jews in the Iberian Peninsula – has shaped both our scholarship and our teaching. At the same time, there is a broad agreement that the Middle Ages did not have a fixed “end,” and many social, political, and cultural developments persisted into the Early Modern period and beyond. In our classrooms, how do we get the students to appreciate the gravity of the late medieval crises while acknowledging the continuities? Does the conventional periodization for the end of the Middle Ages work? What are the best practices in teaching the late medieval period? How does the way we teach it differ across disciplines? How does the concept of crisis speak to students living through modern challenges? For this roundtable we hope to bring together scholars from a variety of disciplines and teaching backgrounds. Maya Soifer Irish

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May 8th, 1:30 PM

Crises and Continuity: Teaching the End of the Middle Ages (A Roundtable)

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

The idea that the Middle Ages ended in a series of crises – including the Great Famine, the Black Death, the Peasants’ Revolt in England, and the massacres of Jews in the Iberian Peninsula – has shaped both our scholarship and our teaching. At the same time, there is a broad agreement that the Middle Ages did not have a fixed “end,” and many social, political, and cultural developments persisted into the Early Modern period and beyond. In our classrooms, how do we get the students to appreciate the gravity of the late medieval crises while acknowledging the continuities? Does the conventional periodization for the end of the Middle Ages work? What are the best practices in teaching the late medieval period? How does the way we teach it differ across disciplines? How does the concept of crisis speak to students living through modern challenges? For this roundtable we hope to bring together scholars from a variety of disciplines and teaching backgrounds. Maya Soifer Irish