Session Title

Humility among Medieval Benedictines: What Was It and Was It Good for Them?

Sponsoring Organization(s)

American Benedictine Academy

Organizer Name

Hugh Bernard Feiss OSB

Organizer Affiliation

Monastery of the Ascension

Presider Name

Maureen M. O'Brien

Presider Affiliation

St. Cloud State Univ.

Paper Title 1

"In haligra hyht heonan astigan": Humility in the Benedictine Reform

Presenter 1 Name

Jacob Riyeff

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Marquette Univ.

Paper Title 2

Gottschalk on Humility

Presenter 2 Name

Colleen Maura McGrane OSB

Presenter 2 Affiliation

American Benedictine Review

Paper Title 3

"O Vere Medicina, Humilitas": Humility in Hildegard of Bingen

Presenter 3 Name

Hugh Bernard Feiss OSB

Paper Title 4

Humility in Berceo's Vida de santo Domingo de Silos

Presenter 4 Name

Carmen J. Wyatt-Hayes

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Hillsdale College

Start Date

8-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1040

Description

Humility is the character trait most referenced and praised by Benedictine authors. Humility is very difficult to define and perhaps no easier to live. The papers in this session investigate how humility was understood by different authors in four different medieval centuries and locales: Gottschalk, a controversial 9th-century monk from Germany; the champions of the Benedictine Reform in England in the 10th century; the 12th-century aristocratic Benedictine world of Hildegard of Bingen; and in 13th-century Spain, the lay poet Gonzalo de Berceo, who was associated with the abbey of St. Millán de Cogolla, and praised the humility of Santo Domingo de Silos in his poetic life of the saint. The session will also consider whether humility was good for the monks and nuns studied. Hugh B. Feiss

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May 8th, 1:30 PM

Humility among Medieval Benedictines: What Was It and Was It Good for Them?

Fetzer 1040

Humility is the character trait most referenced and praised by Benedictine authors. Humility is very difficult to define and perhaps no easier to live. The papers in this session investigate how humility was understood by different authors in four different medieval centuries and locales: Gottschalk, a controversial 9th-century monk from Germany; the champions of the Benedictine Reform in England in the 10th century; the 12th-century aristocratic Benedictine world of Hildegard of Bingen; and in 13th-century Spain, the lay poet Gonzalo de Berceo, who was associated with the abbey of St. Millán de Cogolla, and praised the humility of Santo Domingo de Silos in his poetic life of the saint. The session will also consider whether humility was good for the monks and nuns studied. Hugh B. Feiss