Session Title

Medieval Proverbs I: Afterlives

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Early Proverb Society (EPS)

Organizer Name

Sarah M. Anderson

Organizer Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Presider Name

Sarah M. Anderson

Paper Title 1

Proverbs as Speech Acts: Dynamic Interpretation and Seventeenth-Century Icelandic Manuscripts

Presenter 1 Name

Eric Shane Bryan

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology

Paper Title 2

"Tis better to be comradeless / Than envious comrade to possess": The Instructive Literary Proverb as Rhymed Couplet in the Twelfth-Century Tristan of Thomas, translated by Dorothy L. Sayers

Presenter 2 Name

Barbara L. Prescott

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 3

Ecclesiastes in the Old English Wanderer

Presenter 3 Name

Karl Arthur Erik Persson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Our Lady Seat of Wisdom College

Start Date

9-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1325

Description

The high-functioning proverb is a social creature: its recognizability makes believable an imagined fictional community, facilitating access to the privileged script of fantasy. The medieval proverb always crossed and complexified historical, cultural, and linguistic boundaries: the Proverbs of Alfred vocalize the long-dead king, and medieval romance anchors its wild itinerary to proverbial forms. In our times, Tolkien animates the Shire through faux adages, as does fantasist J.K. Rowling. This panel queries the dynamic social functions of proverbs: their cultural and linguistic code-switching, the entangling of attested with invented maxims, and the credibility proverbs create in medieval and post-medieval fantasy realms. Sarah M. Anderson

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Medieval Proverbs I: Afterlives

Schneider 1325

The high-functioning proverb is a social creature: its recognizability makes believable an imagined fictional community, facilitating access to the privileged script of fantasy. The medieval proverb always crossed and complexified historical, cultural, and linguistic boundaries: the Proverbs of Alfred vocalize the long-dead king, and medieval romance anchors its wild itinerary to proverbial forms. In our times, Tolkien animates the Shire through faux adages, as does fantasist J.K. Rowling. This panel queries the dynamic social functions of proverbs: their cultural and linguistic code-switching, the entangling of attested with invented maxims, and the credibility proverbs create in medieval and post-medieval fantasy realms. Sarah M. Anderson