CONGRESS CANCELED Medieval Proverbs II: Exchanges, Clashes, and Transactions (A Roundtable)

Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University

Description

Proverbs range through most of medieval literature, from catalogues like the OE Maxims I and II, which resist narrative expansion, through Chaucer’s use of monitory material to enlarge narrative possibilities in The Canterbury Tales. Though proverbs elude granular formal criteria, they signal their presence by open constructs of language and style, linking an audience to powerful allusive networks. This session opens up the paradoxes of proverbs: how do proverbs maintain traditional wisdom while engaging in risk-taking? how do proverbs mimic authorizing voices while animating broader ideas of authorship? how do proverbs assert distinctive cultural identities while aspiring to universal ones? Sarah M. Anderson

 
May 9th, 1:30 PM

CONGRESS CANCELED Medieval Proverbs II: Exchanges, Clashes, and Transactions (A Roundtable)

Valley 3 Eldridge 309

Proverbs range through most of medieval literature, from catalogues like the OE Maxims I and II, which resist narrative expansion, through Chaucer’s use of monitory material to enlarge narrative possibilities in The Canterbury Tales. Though proverbs elude granular formal criteria, they signal their presence by open constructs of language and style, linking an audience to powerful allusive networks. This session opens up the paradoxes of proverbs: how do proverbs maintain traditional wisdom while engaging in risk-taking? how do proverbs mimic authorizing voices while animating broader ideas of authorship? how do proverbs assert distinctive cultural identities while aspiring to universal ones? Sarah M. Anderson