Session Title

Medieval Proverbs II: Exchanges, Clashes, and Transactions (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Early Proverb Society (EPS)

Organizer Name

Sarah M. Anderson

Organizer Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Presider Name

Karl Arthur Erik Persson

Presider Affiliation

Our Lady Seat of Wisdom College

Paper Title 1

Proverbial "Pounage" in Chaucer's The Former Age

Presenter 1 Name

Chase J. Padusniak

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Moral of Bēowulf and the Ethics of Bēot: A Study in Paroemial Cognitive Patterning

Presenter 2 Name

Richard L. Harris

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Saskatchewan

Paper Title 3

Proverbs and Narrative Progression

Presenter 3 Name

Johanna Kramer

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia

Paper Title 4

Proverbs in Fouteenth-Century Castile: Don Juan Manuel's Political Agenda

Presenter 4 Name

Margarita del Rosario Angleró

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. de Puerto Rico-Recinto de Río Piedras

Paper Title 5

Proverbiousness in the Old Irish Críth gablach

Presenter 5 Name

Joey McMullen

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Start Date

9-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Valley 3 Eldridge 309

Description

Proverbs range through most of medieval literature, from catalogues like the OE Maxims I and II, which resist narrative expansion, through Chaucer’s use of monitory material to enlarge narrative possibilities in The Canterbury Tales. Though proverbs elude granular formal criteria, they signal their presence by open constructs of language and style, linking an audience to powerful allusive networks. This session opens up the paradoxes of proverbs: how do proverbs maintain traditional wisdom while engaging in risk-taking? how do proverbs mimic authorizing voices while animating broader ideas of authorship? how do proverbs assert distinctive cultural identities while aspiring to universal ones? Sarah M. Anderson

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Medieval Proverbs II: Exchanges, Clashes, and Transactions (A Roundtable)

Valley 3 Eldridge 309

Proverbs range through most of medieval literature, from catalogues like the OE Maxims I and II, which resist narrative expansion, through Chaucer’s use of monitory material to enlarge narrative possibilities in The Canterbury Tales. Though proverbs elude granular formal criteria, they signal their presence by open constructs of language and style, linking an audience to powerful allusive networks. This session opens up the paradoxes of proverbs: how do proverbs maintain traditional wisdom while engaging in risk-taking? how do proverbs mimic authorizing voices while animating broader ideas of authorship? how do proverbs assert distinctive cultural identities while aspiring to universal ones? Sarah M. Anderson