Session Title

Murders, Mishaps, and Martyrs in Medieval Ireland (A Panel Discussion)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

American Society of Irish Medieval Studies (ASIMS); MARTRAE: An International Network Dedicated to Research on Martyrologies, Martyrs, and the Cult of Saints

Organizer Name

Nicole Volmering

Organizer Affiliation

Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nürnberg

Presider Name

Nicole Volmering

Paper Title 1

Death and Politics in Medieval Ireland: Ensuring Legacies

Presenter 1 Name

Lahney Preston-Matto

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Adelphi Univ.

Paper Title 2

A Nation That Can Make Martyrs? Responses to the "Becket Problem" in Twelfth-Century Ireland

Presenter 2 Name

Jesse Harrington

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 3

Baptizing the Murder of John the Baptist: New Evidence on Mog Ruith's Legend

Presenter 3 Name

Tatiana Shingurova

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Aberdeen

Start Date

8-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Sangren 1710

Description

Can murder ever be glorious? Can a misadventurous death be fortuitous as well as tragic? In light of modern tendencies to interpret medieval practices and moralize murder through the lens of political justice, this session considers attitudes to criminal, misadventurous, and heroic deaths in Medieval Ireland (c. 500-1200). Specifically it seeks to juxtapose different social and historical interpretations of death and dying as well as interrogate the cross-over between the legal and literary dimensions of its documentation. Because the approach of the panel is inherently multi-disciplinary, it illuminates novel aspects of murder, martyrdom, and accidental demise, and therefore promises elements of intrigue for a fairly broad medievalist audience. Maire Johnson

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May 8th, 3:30 PM

Murders, Mishaps, and Martyrs in Medieval Ireland (A Panel Discussion)

Sangren 1710

Can murder ever be glorious? Can a misadventurous death be fortuitous as well as tragic? In light of modern tendencies to interpret medieval practices and moralize murder through the lens of political justice, this session considers attitudes to criminal, misadventurous, and heroic deaths in Medieval Ireland (c. 500-1200). Specifically it seeks to juxtapose different social and historical interpretations of death and dying as well as interrogate the cross-over between the legal and literary dimensions of its documentation. Because the approach of the panel is inherently multi-disciplinary, it illuminates novel aspects of murder, martyrdom, and accidental demise, and therefore promises elements of intrigue for a fairly broad medievalist audience. Maire Johnson