Session Title

Medieval Speech Acts

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Speech Act Society

Organizer Name

Eric Shane Bryan

Organizer Affiliation

Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology

Presider Name

Alexander Vaughan Ames

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of South Carolina-Columbia

Paper Title 1

Speaking Disceyte: Speech Acts and Allegorical Decay

Presenter 1 Name

A. Arwen Taylor

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Arkansas Tech Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Pragmatics of Death in Völsungasaga

Presenter 2 Name

Michael S. Nagy

Presenter 2 Affiliation

South Dakota State Univ.

Paper Title 3

"Quhair is . . . ?": Speech Acts in Robert Henryson's Testament of Cresseid

Presenter 3 Name

Jill M. Fitzgerald

Presenter 3 Affiliation

United States Naval Academy

Start Date

9-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1355

Description

The study of medieval speech acts and pragmatic meaning offers a valuable, innovative tool to longstanding interests in the medieval world, including explorations of gender, race, cultural development, religious change, legal history, and more. Over the last two decades, linguists have produced a remarkable amount of scholarship dedicated to the advancement historical pragmatics, with much of this recent work focusing on literary and historical texts produced prior to 1700, including important studies in Old English, Middle English, Old Norse, Middle High German, and the History of English.

The papers in this session will address these matters in Old Norse, Middle English, and Middle Scots sources.

Eric Shane Bryan

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Speech Acts

Schneider 1355

The study of medieval speech acts and pragmatic meaning offers a valuable, innovative tool to longstanding interests in the medieval world, including explorations of gender, race, cultural development, religious change, legal history, and more. Over the last two decades, linguists have produced a remarkable amount of scholarship dedicated to the advancement historical pragmatics, with much of this recent work focusing on literary and historical texts produced prior to 1700, including important studies in Old English, Middle English, Old Norse, Middle High German, and the History of English.

The papers in this session will address these matters in Old Norse, Middle English, and Middle Scots sources.

Eric Shane Bryan