Session Title

Reimagining "the Middle Ages"

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Pacific

Organizer Name

Miranda Wilcox

Organizer Affiliation

Brigham Young Univ.

Presider Name

Miranda Wilcox

Paper Title 1

Discarding The Discarded Image: Alternatives to C. S. Lewis's Medieval Cosmography

Presenter 1 Name

Thomas P. Klein

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Idaho State Univ.

Paper Title 2

From "Tissues of Silk and Gold" to Fibers of the Harakeke: Re-Weaving the Medieval Past

Presenter 2 Name

Katie Robison

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Southern California

Paper Title 3

Contact and Context: Dismantling the Myths of Medieval Settlement

Presenter 3 Name

Wallace Cleaves

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Riverside

Paper Title 4

Addressing Stereotypes with Public Outreach: The VCB Project

Presenter 4 Name

Dayanna Knight

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Viking Coloring Book Project

Start Date

8-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1010

Description

"The Middle Ages" are created and maintained by those who imagine them today, lending urgency to the project of narrating a global medieval that resists the field's racist and nationalist myths. Given a need for new imaginaries: What prospects of medievalism arise when medieval sources are freed from their nineteenth-century creation myths? How do medieval depictions of cross-cultural encounter provoke new imaginaries? How might medievalists ethically incorporate premodern Indigenous and Pacific Rim cultural artifacts to imagine beyond, rather than replicate, settler-colonial and imperialist mode(l)s? What can medieval sources offer, imaginatively encountered in the public sphere or classroom, to new audiences? Miranda Wilcox

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May 8th, 3:30 PM

Reimagining "the Middle Ages"

Fetzer 1010

"The Middle Ages" are created and maintained by those who imagine them today, lending urgency to the project of narrating a global medieval that resists the field's racist and nationalist myths. Given a need for new imaginaries: What prospects of medievalism arise when medieval sources are freed from their nineteenth-century creation myths? How do medieval depictions of cross-cultural encounter provoke new imaginaries? How might medievalists ethically incorporate premodern Indigenous and Pacific Rim cultural artifacts to imagine beyond, rather than replicate, settler-colonial and imperialist mode(l)s? What can medieval sources offer, imaginatively encountered in the public sphere or classroom, to new audiences? Miranda Wilcox