Session Title

Becket at 850 II: Pilgrims, Pilgrimages and Artifacts

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Cary J. Nederman

Organizer Affiliation

Texas A&M Univ.

Presider Name

Alyce A. Jordan

Presider Affiliation

Northern Arizona Univ.

Paper Title 1

John of Salisbury and the "Sacamental" Box

Presenter 1 Name

Karen Bollermann

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 2

"Felix Locus": Procession and Liturgy at Canterbury Cathedral, 1173-1220

Presenter 2 Name

Katherine Emery

Presenter 2 Affiliation

King’s College London

Paper Title 3

Picturing Martyrdom: Norwich Cathedral Bosses and Origins of Their Iconography

Presenter 3 Name

Zina Uzdenskaya

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Start Date

9-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 209

Description

2020 marks the 850th anniversary of Archbishop Thomas Becket’s assassination (and 800th anniversary of his translation) in Canterbury Cathedral. Becket’s murder by King Henry II’s four knights constituted a turning point for the English church, in both its relations with the crown and Canterbury’s claim to primacy. Becket’s martyrdom reverberated throughout English society. His miracles vaulted Canterbury into a premier pilgrimage site. His story was retold in stained glass across England’s and Continental cathedrals. Christendom’s newest saint became a powerful symbol of sacrifice for the Church’s cause. From almost immediately following his death time, Becket’s story was recounted in material culture of all sorts.

--Karen Bollermann and Cary J. Nederman

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Becket at 850 II: Pilgrims, Pilgrimages and Artifacts

Bernhard 209

2020 marks the 850th anniversary of Archbishop Thomas Becket’s assassination (and 800th anniversary of his translation) in Canterbury Cathedral. Becket’s murder by King Henry II’s four knights constituted a turning point for the English church, in both its relations with the crown and Canterbury’s claim to primacy. Becket’s martyrdom reverberated throughout English society. His miracles vaulted Canterbury into a premier pilgrimage site. His story was retold in stained glass across England’s and Continental cathedrals. Christendom’s newest saint became a powerful symbol of sacrifice for the Church’s cause. From almost immediately following his death time, Becket’s story was recounted in material culture of all sorts.

--Karen Bollermann and Cary J. Nederman