Session Title

Becket at 850 I: The Politics of Martyrdom

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Cary J. Nederman

Organizer Affiliation

Texas A&M Univ.

Presider Name

Karen Bollermann

Presider Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 1

Archbishop Theobald between Becket and John of Salisbury, or, What Really Happened at Reims?

Presenter 1 Name

Cary J. Nederman

Paper Title 2

Was Becket an Ideal Archbishop? Exegesis and Theories of Leadership in the Decades after His Martyrdom

Presenter 2 Name

John D. Cotts

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Whitman College

Paper Title 3

Revising Becket: A Katherine Passion and the Crisis of the Magna Carta at Canterbury

Presenter 3 Name

Donna Alfano Bussell

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Illinois-Springfield

Paper Title 4

Thomas Becket and "Martirs þat Hardy Kniȝts Were": Images of the Holy Knight in the South English Legendary

Presenter 4 Name

Tristan B. Taylor

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Saskatchewan

Start Date

9-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 209

Description

2020 marks the 850th anniversary of Archbishop Thomas Becket’s assassination (as well as(probably) the 700th birthday and 800th anniversary of his translation) in Canterbury Cathedral. Becket’s murder by King Henry II’s four knights constituted a turning point for the English church, in both its relations with the crown and Canterbury’s claim to primacy. Becket’s martyrdom reverberated throughout English and European society. His miracles vaulted Canterbury into a premier pilgrimage site. His story was retold in stained glass across England’s and Continental cathedrals. Christendom’s newest saint became a powerful symbol of sacrifice for the Church’s cause.

--Karen Bollermann and Cary J. Nederman

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Becket at 850 I: The Politics of Martyrdom

Bernhard 209

2020 marks the 850th anniversary of Archbishop Thomas Becket’s assassination (as well as(probably) the 700th birthday and 800th anniversary of his translation) in Canterbury Cathedral. Becket’s murder by King Henry II’s four knights constituted a turning point for the English church, in both its relations with the crown and Canterbury’s claim to primacy. Becket’s martyrdom reverberated throughout English and European society. His miracles vaulted Canterbury into a premier pilgrimage site. His story was retold in stained glass across England’s and Continental cathedrals. Christendom’s newest saint became a powerful symbol of sacrifice for the Church’s cause.

--Karen Bollermann and Cary J. Nederman