Session Title

The Latin Classics in the Medieval Classroom II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for Medieval Literature, Syddansk Univ. and Univ. of York; Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto

Organizer Name

Alexander Andrée

Organizer Affiliation

Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto

Presider Name

Christopher Michael Berard

Presider Affiliation

Providence College

Paper Title 1

Teaching the Georgics at Laon and Beyond: Evidence from the Twelfth-Century Cathedral Schools

Presenter 1 Name

Simon Whedbee

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 2

Teaching the Classics to Girls in the Eleventh Century: The Regensburg Poems in Context

Presenter 2 Name

Justin A. Haynes

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Davis

Paper Title 3

Peter Comestor and the Classics: Preaching Scripture and Latin Literature at the Cathedral School of Paris

Presenter 3 Name

Benjamin Durham

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto

Start Date

8-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Valley 2 LeFevre Lounge

Description

The study of ancient Roman literature formed the backbone of education wherever Latin was studied in the European Middle Ages. To bolster their understanding of grammar, history, and how moral actions could shape future events, medieval pedagogues turned for inspiration to the classic textbooks handed on from past generations. These two panels discussing “The Latin Classics in the Medieval Classroom” afford participants an opportunity to explore the reception, interpretation, and employment of Greco-Roman literature by medieval societies, and enables dialogue concerning pressing historiographic topics as broad as Late Antiquity, pedagogies in pre-modern contexts, and the relationship between branches of knowledge in medieval education. Alexander Andree

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May 8th, 1:30 PM

The Latin Classics in the Medieval Classroom II

Valley 2 LeFevre Lounge

The study of ancient Roman literature formed the backbone of education wherever Latin was studied in the European Middle Ages. To bolster their understanding of grammar, history, and how moral actions could shape future events, medieval pedagogues turned for inspiration to the classic textbooks handed on from past generations. These two panels discussing “The Latin Classics in the Medieval Classroom” afford participants an opportunity to explore the reception, interpretation, and employment of Greco-Roman literature by medieval societies, and enables dialogue concerning pressing historiographic topics as broad as Late Antiquity, pedagogies in pre-modern contexts, and the relationship between branches of knowledge in medieval education. Alexander Andree