Session Title

Object and Affect in Anglo-Saxon Texts

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Organizer Name

Maggie Heeschen

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Presider Name

Maggie Heeschen

Paper Title 1

The Affect of Reading Drinking Horns in Beowulf

Presenter 1 Name

Andrea Waldrep

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Paper Title 2

The Hilt from the Hoard, Hrothgar's Homily, and Arrested Kingship in Beowulf

Presenter 2 Name

R. Jesse Stratton

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Paper Title 3

The Material Dimension of Sensations: Objects as Mediators of Sensory Experiences in Anglo-Saxon Medical Texts

Presenter 3 Name

Irene Tenchini

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Queen’s Univ. Belfast

Paper Title 4

Horror, Voyeurism, and Corporeal Affect: Phalaris's Brazen Bull in the Old English Orosius

Presenter 4 Name

Karen E. Soto

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Start Date

9-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1320

Description

This session seeks papers that explore the interplay between object and affect in Anglo-Saxon texts. Increasing interest in the application of Affect Theory to literary criticism has prompted scholars to more critically examine the role of affect in medieval texts. We are specifically interested in work that considers the role of objects and material culture as the impetus for affective responses. We seek papers querying object and affect in any language and genre in Anglo-Saxon England, including but not limited to hagiography, riddles, homilies, laments, and histories. Possible approaches include applications of performativity, cognitive theory, reader-response criticism, and object-oriented ontology.

Maggie Heeschen, heesc011@umn.edu

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Object and Affect in Anglo-Saxon Texts

Schneider 1320

This session seeks papers that explore the interplay between object and affect in Anglo-Saxon texts. Increasing interest in the application of Affect Theory to literary criticism has prompted scholars to more critically examine the role of affect in medieval texts. We are specifically interested in work that considers the role of objects and material culture as the impetus for affective responses. We seek papers querying object and affect in any language and genre in Anglo-Saxon England, including but not limited to hagiography, riddles, homilies, laments, and histories. Possible approaches include applications of performativity, cognitive theory, reader-response criticism, and object-oriented ontology.

Maggie Heeschen, heesc011@umn.edu