Session Title

Bodies that Transform: Visual, Material, and Conceptual Transitions

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Material Collective

Organizer Name

Alicia R. Cannizzo

Organizer Affiliation

Graduate Center, CUNY

Presider Name

Maeve Doyle

Presider Affiliation

Eastern Connecticut State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Butler and þæt Bodiġ: Constructing, Performing, and (Mis)Reading the Female Body in Ælfric's Life of Saint Agnes

Presenter 1 Name

Thelma Trujillo

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Illinois State Univ.

Paper Title 2

Of Breasts and Beards: Hirsutism and the Shifting Genders of Saint Wilgefortis and the Lady of Limerick in Late Medieval Visual Culture

Presenter 2 Name

Sara Berkowitz

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Maryland

Paper Title 3

Menopause: Melusine's Final Transformation

Presenter 3 Name

S. C. Kaplan

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Rice Univ.

Paper Title 4

Respondent

Presenter 4 Name

Roland Betancourt

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Irvine

Start Date

7-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1010

Description

Visual, material, and textual records reflect medieval bodies' potential for fluidity, transition, and transformation. These transformations could affirm an identity or disguise it; reflect divine will or fairy magic; make visible internal conversions; anticipate the transformations of the body in death, or transcend them. Transformation and change were at the heart of conversations surrounding critical aspects of human life: birth, death, gender, aging, even (within Christianity) the miracle of the Host. This panel explores the crucial role that the concept of the transforming body played in the medieval world. Maggie M. Williams

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May 7th, 3:30 PM

Bodies that Transform: Visual, Material, and Conceptual Transitions

Fetzer 1010

Visual, material, and textual records reflect medieval bodies' potential for fluidity, transition, and transformation. These transformations could affirm an identity or disguise it; reflect divine will or fairy magic; make visible internal conversions; anticipate the transformations of the body in death, or transcend them. Transformation and change were at the heart of conversations surrounding critical aspects of human life: birth, death, gender, aging, even (within Christianity) the miracle of the Host. This panel explores the crucial role that the concept of the transforming body played in the medieval world. Maggie M. Williams