Session Title

Antisemitism, Race, and Performance

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Studies in the Age of Chaucer

Organizer Name

Michelle Karnes

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Presider Name

Michelle Karnes

Paper Title 1

The Victim Syndrome: Projective Inversion in The Prioress's Tale and the Passio judeorum Pragensium (1389)

Presenter 1 Name

Alfred Thomas

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Illinois-Chicago

Paper Title 2

Performing Medieval Jewface

Presenter 2 Name

Sylvia Tomasch

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Hunter College, CUNY

Paper Title 3

What We Talk About When We Talk about the Prioress

Presenter 3 Name

Heather Blurton

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Santa Barbara

Start Date

10-5-2020 10:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2016

Description

In the Invention of Race, Geraldine Heng defines race and religion as overlapping and mutually sustaining categories. Writing about the “conflations of religion with race” in the Devisement, for instance, she also proposes that medieval texts themselves merge the two. This session focuses on the relationship between race and religion in the works of Chaucer. Does he distinguish meaningfully between racial and religious identities? Is it accurate, or advisable, for scholars to collapse the categories? What do we gain or lose by doing so? Papers might focus not just on representations of Jewish and Muslim characters, but also Christian ones. Does Chaucer conceive of Christian identity differently than non-Christian identities? How do his definitions resemble or differ from those in use today? Michelle Karnes

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May 10th, 10:30 AM

Antisemitism, Race, and Performance

Fetzer 2016

In the Invention of Race, Geraldine Heng defines race and religion as overlapping and mutually sustaining categories. Writing about the “conflations of religion with race” in the Devisement, for instance, she also proposes that medieval texts themselves merge the two. This session focuses on the relationship between race and religion in the works of Chaucer. Does he distinguish meaningfully between racial and religious identities? Is it accurate, or advisable, for scholars to collapse the categories? What do we gain or lose by doing so? Papers might focus not just on representations of Jewish and Muslim characters, but also Christian ones. Does Chaucer conceive of Christian identity differently than non-Christian identities? How do his definitions resemble or differ from those in use today? Michelle Karnes