Session Title

Saving the Day for Medievalists: Accessing Medieval-Themed Comics in the Twenty-First Century I: Comics and the Classroom (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Comics Project

Organizer Name

Michael A. Torregrossa

Organizer Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Presider Name

Jolanta N. Komornicka

Presider Affiliation

St. Jerome's Univ., Univ. of Waterloo

Paper Title 1

Comics and the Canon: Medieval and Medievalist Texts in the Undergraduate Literature Classroom

Presenter 1 Name

Dustin M. Frazier Wood

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Roehampton

Paper Title 2

Arthurian Legend, Animal-Centric Illustration, and Play in David Petersen’s Mouse Guard

Presenter 2 Name

Justin Wigard

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Michigan State Univ.

Paper Title 3

Aquaman to Arthur: How the Round Table Lives on in Comics

Presenter 3 Name

Kara Larson Maloney

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Canisius College

Paper Title 4

From Medieval Texts to Contemporary Comics: Sacred Spaces and Communication with the Other World

Presenter 4 Name

Geneviève Pigeon

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. du Québec-Montréal

Paper Title 5

Medievalist Comics, Comixology, and eReaders: Embracing Digital Reading and the Uses of eReaders in Scholarly Pursuits

Presenter 5 Name

Carl B. Sell

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Oklahoma Panhandle State Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Sangren 1740

Description

Most medievalists have come to accept popular manifestations of the Middle Ages and are willing to talk about fiction, film, and television programs in their classrooms, and some are even writing about these items in their scholarship; however, few have as readily embraced the material produced in the comics medium. This fault is not due to a lack of interest. As our sessions over the past two decades attest, many medievalists are curious about how the comics have adapted medieval figures, events, and stories, but a much smaller group knows how to access this corpus and use it profitably for research and teaching.

Thus, the goal of this session, sponsored by The Medieval Comics Project, is to attempt to rectify this neglect by to presenting some overviews, by an assortment of medieval-comics scholars, of how the comics have appropriated some of the most well-known material from the Middle Ages (such as Beowulf, the Crusades, Dante’s Commedia, the Matter of Britain, Norse mythology, and the Robin Hood legend) to provide insight into what has been done so far in terms of comics and comics scholarship with regards to these topics and what kind of work might be done in the future.

Suggestions for topics and resources can be accessed at both The Medieval Comics Project site (https://medieval-comics-project.blogspot.com/) and its sibling The Arthur of the Comics Project site (https://arthur-of-the-comics-project.blogspot.com/). Additional material on the comics medium appears at our Saving the Day: Accessing Comics in the Twentieth-first Century site (https://accessing-comics-in-the-21st-century.blogspot.com/).

Michael A. Torregrossa

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May 8th, 10:00 AM

Saving the Day for Medievalists: Accessing Medieval-Themed Comics in the Twenty-First Century I: Comics and the Classroom (A Roundtable)

Sangren 1740

Most medievalists have come to accept popular manifestations of the Middle Ages and are willing to talk about fiction, film, and television programs in their classrooms, and some are even writing about these items in their scholarship; however, few have as readily embraced the material produced in the comics medium. This fault is not due to a lack of interest. As our sessions over the past two decades attest, many medievalists are curious about how the comics have adapted medieval figures, events, and stories, but a much smaller group knows how to access this corpus and use it profitably for research and teaching.

Thus, the goal of this session, sponsored by The Medieval Comics Project, is to attempt to rectify this neglect by to presenting some overviews, by an assortment of medieval-comics scholars, of how the comics have appropriated some of the most well-known material from the Middle Ages (such as Beowulf, the Crusades, Dante’s Commedia, the Matter of Britain, Norse mythology, and the Robin Hood legend) to provide insight into what has been done so far in terms of comics and comics scholarship with regards to these topics and what kind of work might be done in the future.

Suggestions for topics and resources can be accessed at both The Medieval Comics Project site (https://medieval-comics-project.blogspot.com/) and its sibling The Arthur of the Comics Project site (https://arthur-of-the-comics-project.blogspot.com/). Additional material on the comics medium appears at our Saving the Day: Accessing Comics in the Twentieth-first Century site (https://accessing-comics-in-the-21st-century.blogspot.com/).

Michael A. Torregrossa