Session Title

Medieval Becomings: Animal: Animals, Language, and Translation

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Oecologies: Inhabiting Premodern Worlds

Organizer Name

Mo Pareles

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of British Columbia

Presider Name

Mo Pareles

Paper Title 1

Half Swine, Half Sow: Staging Male Motherhood in the Middle Welsh Tale of Math

Presenter 1 Name

Coral Anne Lumbley

Presenter 1 Affiliation

New York Univ.

Paper Title 2

Translating Animal Silence

Presenter 2 Name

Peggy McCracken

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Paper Title 3

Creation's Chorus: Sound and Sentience in Anglo-Saxon Riddles

Presenter 3 Name

Robert Stanton

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Boston College

Start Date

7-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2040

Description

In Abu ibn Khalawayh’s tenth-century lexicographical treatise The Names of the Lion, translated by David Larsen in 2017 as poetry, human epithets for lions exemplify the extraordinary creativity and precision of the Arabic language and (in Larsen’s iteration) the eccentric generativity of medieval linguistic minds. The Names of the Lion also provokes questions about the place of non-human linguistic capacity in medieval language scholarship, and about how the cultural and historical violence of translation overlaps with (or opposes) species violence and the appropriation of animals as alibis for human political violence. In this panel, we welcome all proposals that address the overlapping concerns of animal studies and of the politics of language and/or translation. Papers might address animality and linguistic racialization, the gendering of medieval animal voices, medieval becomings-animal in poetic translation, the material use of animal bodies in language pedagogy, “foreignizing” and “domesticating” translations of the nonhuman, and anything else the cat drags in. David Coley

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May 7th, 1:30 PM

Medieval Becomings: Animal: Animals, Language, and Translation

Fetzer 2040

In Abu ibn Khalawayh’s tenth-century lexicographical treatise The Names of the Lion, translated by David Larsen in 2017 as poetry, human epithets for lions exemplify the extraordinary creativity and precision of the Arabic language and (in Larsen’s iteration) the eccentric generativity of medieval linguistic minds. The Names of the Lion also provokes questions about the place of non-human linguistic capacity in medieval language scholarship, and about how the cultural and historical violence of translation overlaps with (or opposes) species violence and the appropriation of animals as alibis for human political violence. In this panel, we welcome all proposals that address the overlapping concerns of animal studies and of the politics of language and/or translation. Papers might address animality and linguistic racialization, the gendering of medieval animal voices, medieval becomings-animal in poetic translation, the material use of animal bodies in language pedagogy, “foreignizing” and “domesticating” translations of the nonhuman, and anything else the cat drags in. David Coley