Session Title

New Ways to Teach Medieval Medicine (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages

Organizer Name

William H. York

Organizer Affiliation

Portland State Univ.

Presider Name

Nichola Harris

Presider Affiliation

SUNY-Ulster

Paper Title 1

The Justinianic Plague App as a Resource for Teaching and Research

Presenter 1 Name

Lee Mordechai

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem

Paper Title 2

Black Death Digital Archive: A Multidisciplinary Database of the Second Plague Pandemic

Presenter 2 Name

Nükhet Varlik

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of South Carolina-Columbia

Paper Title 3

Choosing and Using Medieval Medicine Primary Sources

Presenter 3 Name

Winston Black

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 4

Imaging Medieval Medicine in the Classroom

Presenter 4 Name

Lori Jones

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Carleton Univ./Univ. of Ottawa

Paper Title 5

"But Did They Know What They Were Doing?": Medieval Medicine in the Undergraduate Classroom

Presenter 5 Name

Lucy C. Barnhouse

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Wartburg College

Start Date

8-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2016

Description

This roundtable brings together scholars who will explore new tools and methods for teaching medieval medicine. The tools and ideas presented here are intended for anyone who might wish to include a module on health and disease in a broader course on the Middle Ages, not only for those seeking to teach courses focused on medieval medicine. Some speakers will examine various new digital technologies available for use in classroom settings. Others will consider the ways in which the history of medicine might be taught in the broader context of the global Middle Ages. William H. York

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May 8th, 3:30 PM

New Ways to Teach Medieval Medicine (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 2016

This roundtable brings together scholars who will explore new tools and methods for teaching medieval medicine. The tools and ideas presented here are intended for anyone who might wish to include a module on health and disease in a broader course on the Middle Ages, not only for those seeking to teach courses focused on medieval medicine. Some speakers will examine various new digital technologies available for use in classroom settings. Others will consider the ways in which the history of medicine might be taught in the broader context of the global Middle Ages. William H. York