Session Title

Healing and the Healer in Popular Culture

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages

Organizer Name

William H. York

Organizer Affiliation

Portland State Univ.

Presider Name

William H. York

Paper Title 1

Popular Medicine in Rutebeuf's "Le Dit de l'herberie": Weighing Salescraft and Healing Knowledge in Selling Remedies

Presenter 1 Name

Laine E. Doggett

Presenter 1 Affiliation

St. Mary's College of Maryland

Paper Title 2

"To Your Health!": Examining the Influence of Medical Knowledge on Fourteenth-Century English Cuisine

Presenter 2 Name

Hannah Lloyd

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 3

Sir Knight, Heal Thyself: Healing among Knights Errant in Some Early Grail Narratives

Presenter 3 Name

Helga Ruppe

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Western Univ.

Paper Title 4

"She is said to be a diviner": Recovering Empirical Medical Practice in the Fourteenth-Century Catalonian Pastoral Visitations

Presenter 4 Name

Rachel Podd

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 2016

Description

This session seeks to explore the perceptions and understandings of health maintenance, disease prevention and treatment, medical practitioners, etc., in the practices of healers outside the university sphere in the Middle Ages. The practices of women healers, religious-based healers, practitioners of folk medicine, healing saints, and other empirically-trained doctors would be ideal topics of analysis for this session. Possible papers could examine sources like household recipe books, legal regulations of medical practice, depictions of healing in popular literature, artistic representations of healers, or similar sources. William H. York

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 8th, 1:30 PM

Healing and the Healer in Popular Culture

Fetzer 2016

This session seeks to explore the perceptions and understandings of health maintenance, disease prevention and treatment, medical practitioners, etc., in the practices of healers outside the university sphere in the Middle Ages. The practices of women healers, religious-based healers, practitioners of folk medicine, healing saints, and other empirically-trained doctors would be ideal topics of analysis for this session. Possible papers could examine sources like household recipe books, legal regulations of medical practice, depictions of healing in popular literature, artistic representations of healers, or similar sources. William H. York