Session Title

Treating Animals: Veterinary Science in the Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Bethany Christiansen; Aylin Malcolm

Organizer Affiliation

Ohio State Univ.; Univ. of Pennsylvania

Presider Name

Aylin Malcolm

Paper Title 1

Fighting Dire Prognoses: Intra-Active Healing in Thirteenth-Century Equine Veterinary Praxis

Presenter 1 Name

Elizabeth S. Leet

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Franklin & Marshall College

Paper Title 2

I'll Have What He's Having: Indo-European Horse and Human Charms

Presenter 2 Name

Stéfan Koekemoer

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of New Mexico

Paper Title 3

English Equine Veterinary Manuals and the Translation of Species

Presenter 3 Name

Francine McGregor

Presenter 3 Affiliation

New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, Arizona State Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2020 10:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

Medieval animal studies has tended to privilege literary and encyclopedic texts, viewing animals within Aristotelian hierarchies of rationality, while research on animals in medieval medicine has focused on their use as ingredients, rather than their potential status as patients. There have been few discussions of animals and humans in relationships of care, or of animals as the recipients of medical treatment. In this panel, we seek to expand these conversations by centering veterinary medicine, including treatment manuals (e.g., hawking handbooks), literary representations of veterinary practices (e.g., romance heroes caring for horses), and other genres that concern the (un)ethical, (il)legal, or (im)proper treatment, training, or keeping of animals. In light of the ongoing Anthropocene extinction, we believe that medieval veterinary texts and allied genres can contribute to the urgent philosophical project of decentering the human, enabling us to describe relationships of mutual benefit between humans and animals in this period, and to cultivate more ethical perspectives today. Anne V. Aylin Malcolm

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May 10th, 10:30 AM

Treating Animals: Veterinary Science in the Middle Ages

Fetzer 2030

Medieval animal studies has tended to privilege literary and encyclopedic texts, viewing animals within Aristotelian hierarchies of rationality, while research on animals in medieval medicine has focused on their use as ingredients, rather than their potential status as patients. There have been few discussions of animals and humans in relationships of care, or of animals as the recipients of medical treatment. In this panel, we seek to expand these conversations by centering veterinary medicine, including treatment manuals (e.g., hawking handbooks), literary representations of veterinary practices (e.g., romance heroes caring for horses), and other genres that concern the (un)ethical, (il)legal, or (im)proper treatment, training, or keeping of animals. In light of the ongoing Anthropocene extinction, we believe that medieval veterinary texts and allied genres can contribute to the urgent philosophical project of decentering the human, enabling us to describe relationships of mutual benefit between humans and animals in this period, and to cultivate more ethical perspectives today. Anne V. Aylin Malcolm