Session Title

"I said of laughter, 'It is folly'": Humor and Laughter in Medieval Literature, Art, and Thought I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Kleio Pethainou

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Edinburgh

Presider Name

Kleio Pethainou

Paper Title 1

"Hann er málugr ok hlær mjǫk": Laughter in the Íslendingaþættir

Presenter 1 Name

Claudia Hoßbach

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Cambridge

Paper Title 2

Subversive Humor in Brennu-Njáls

Presenter 2 Name

Thomas Ireland-Delfs

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Háskóli Íslands

Paper Title 3

Is This Supposed to Be Funny? Uncertain Laughter in the Folie Tristan d'Oxford and the Vita Merlin

Presenter 3 Name

Monika Otter

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Dartmouth College

Start Date

7-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 208

Description

The session explores different expressions, receptions and functions of humor in Medieval literature, art and thought, bringing together various established and emerging directions of medieval humor research.

Simultaneously transgressive and socially specific, humour challenges and defines boundaries at the same time. It can be a relief mechanism and an instrument of control and propaganda, and it can contribute to the ways societies and individuals define themselves.

This session explores themes of madness and exclusion from society, in painful and funny ways. It applies the theories of humor presented by John Morreall and the concept of the Trickster,to discuss Old Norse myth, the character of Loki and Icelanding sagas. Finally, it deals with laughter as a trigger for social mechanisms, and it as a social corrective.

Kleio Pethainou

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May 7th, 1:30 PM

"I said of laughter, 'It is folly'": Humor and Laughter in Medieval Literature, Art, and Thought I

Bernhard 208

The session explores different expressions, receptions and functions of humor in Medieval literature, art and thought, bringing together various established and emerging directions of medieval humor research.

Simultaneously transgressive and socially specific, humour challenges and defines boundaries at the same time. It can be a relief mechanism and an instrument of control and propaganda, and it can contribute to the ways societies and individuals define themselves.

This session explores themes of madness and exclusion from society, in painful and funny ways. It applies the theories of humor presented by John Morreall and the concept of the Trickster,to discuss Old Norse myth, the character of Loki and Icelanding sagas. Finally, it deals with laughter as a trigger for social mechanisms, and it as a social corrective.

Kleio Pethainou