Session Title

Theories on Monasticism in the Twelfth Century

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Cistercian and Monastic Studies, Western Michigan Univ.

Organizer Name

Aage Rydstrøm-Poulsen

Organizer Affiliation

Ilisimatusarfik

Presider Name

Marvin Döbler

Presider Affiliation

Ev.-luth. Landeskirche Hannovers

Paper Title 1

The New Monastery: Innovations of Mind and Action

Presenter 1 Name

Luis Cortez OCSO

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Abbey of New Clairvaux

Paper Title 2

The Ideology of the Asceticism and the Cell-Life according to William of Saint-Thierry

Presenter 2 Name

Aage Rydstrøm-Poulsen

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Ilisimatusarfik

Paper Title 3

Bernard of Clairvaux and the Monastic Life: A New Biography

Presenter 3 Name

Brian Patrick McGuire

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Start Date

9-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1040

Description

Our knowledge about theories on lifestyle and theological anthropology in the formative period of the history of culture of the Western world. Along with being the form of life for an intellectual elite, monasticism was the structure of life for a moral elite. Thus, monasticism could be a first class Christian lifestyle whereas human life outside the wall of the monasteries was more remote from the heavenly salvation. Monasticism can be seen as an ambitious goal of intellectual and moral life and undoubtedly an important part of the history of the theological anthropology of the Western culture. But the monastics of the time did also their own deeper reflections on the meaning of monastic life. Aage Rydstrom-Pulsen

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Theories on Monasticism in the Twelfth Century

Fetzer 1040

Our knowledge about theories on lifestyle and theological anthropology in the formative period of the history of culture of the Western world. Along with being the form of life for an intellectual elite, monasticism was the structure of life for a moral elite. Thus, monasticism could be a first class Christian lifestyle whereas human life outside the wall of the monasteries was more remote from the heavenly salvation. Monasticism can be seen as an ambitious goal of intellectual and moral life and undoubtedly an important part of the history of the theological anthropology of the Western culture. But the monastics of the time did also their own deeper reflections on the meaning of monastic life. Aage Rydstrom-Pulsen