Session Title

Medieval Eco-Migrations

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Oecologies: Inhabiting Premodern Worlds

Organizer Name

David K. Coley

Organizer Affiliation

Simon Fraser Univ.

Presider Name

David K. Coley

Paper Title 1

The Transmigration of Richard Coeur de Lion

Presenter 1 Name

Meg Feller

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Louisiana State Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Female Body and the Animal Body: Migration in Medieval Romance

Presenter 2 Name

Sarah Nickel Moore

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Washington-Seattle

Paper Title 3

Migration as "Arrest and Disappearance": Temporalities of Decay in Old and Middle English Poetics

Presenter 3 Name

Evelyn Reynolds

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 4

The "Court Out of Doors" as Mobile Ecosystem: The Inter-Local and Intra-Local Migrations of the Ottoman Royal Court as Represented in Imperial Annals (ca. 1650-1750)

Presenter 4 Name

Arlen Wiesenthal

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Start Date

9-5-2020 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 158

Description

In the early years of the Anthropocene, we have already witnessed increased migration and refugeeism driven by environmental factors. Climate-related crop failure, changing weather patterns, rising sea levels, conflict over dwindling resources—such events have accelerated and at times precipitated human migration in many parts of the world, both internally and across international borders. This paper panel will consider precedents for such eco-migrations from the global Middle Ages and will investigate how such migrations affected, effaced, elided, and otherwise challenged (and continue to challenge) intersecting national, racial, and religious boundaries. David Coley

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Eco-Migrations

Bernhard 158

In the early years of the Anthropocene, we have already witnessed increased migration and refugeeism driven by environmental factors. Climate-related crop failure, changing weather patterns, rising sea levels, conflict over dwindling resources—such events have accelerated and at times precipitated human migration in many parts of the world, both internally and across international borders. This paper panel will consider precedents for such eco-migrations from the global Middle Ages and will investigate how such migrations affected, effaced, elided, and otherwise challenged (and continue to challenge) intersecting national, racial, and religious boundaries. David Coley