Session Title

Medieval/Digital Reading Environments and Practices

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Digital Philology: A Journal of Medieval Cultures

Organizer Name

Deborah McGrady

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Virginia

Presider Name

Deborah McGrady

Paper Title 1

Communities of Knowledge: Readers of Medieval Books Then and Now

Presenter 1 Name

Neil B. Weijer

Presenter 1 Affiliation

George A. Smathers Libraries, Univ. of Florida

Paper Title 2

Medieval(ist) Approaches to Digital Errors

Presenter 2 Name

Bridget Whearty

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Binghamton Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Accessibility of Medieval Manuscript Culture in Digital Environments

Presenter 3 Name

Heather Bamford; Emily C. Francomano

Presenter 3 Affiliation

George Washington Univ.; Georgetown Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2020 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

Research by both industry and reading specialists into digital reading practices has shifted in the past decade to discussions of how to foster simultaneously personalized reading experiences and social reading opportunities that encourage collaborative engagement, provide new ways of managing and interpreting data, and promote multimodal literacy. This session is based on the belief that mutual insight can be gained by placing these concerns in dialogue with both the medieval reading experience and medievalists’ dealings with the digitized manuscript.

Papers may focus on medieval theories, practices and technologies of reading, modern social engagement with digitized texts and manuscripts, or both. Suggested topics and approaches might include:

  • Formation and function of social networks or communities of readers
  • Reading practices and literacies: collaborative reading, multimodal reading, distant reading
  • Social identities as shaped by shared reading
  • Manuscripts and/or digital media designed for social reading
  • Digitally created social reading spaces
  • Notions of private and public, closed and open texts and media
  • Political, legal and ethical ramifications of social reading

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May 8th, 10:00 AM

Medieval/Digital Reading Environments and Practices

Fetzer 1005

Research by both industry and reading specialists into digital reading practices has shifted in the past decade to discussions of how to foster simultaneously personalized reading experiences and social reading opportunities that encourage collaborative engagement, provide new ways of managing and interpreting data, and promote multimodal literacy. This session is based on the belief that mutual insight can be gained by placing these concerns in dialogue with both the medieval reading experience and medievalists’ dealings with the digitized manuscript.

Papers may focus on medieval theories, practices and technologies of reading, modern social engagement with digitized texts and manuscripts, or both. Suggested topics and approaches might include:

  • Formation and function of social networks or communities of readers
  • Reading practices and literacies: collaborative reading, multimodal reading, distant reading
  • Social identities as shaped by shared reading
  • Manuscripts and/or digital media designed for social reading
  • Digitally created social reading spaces
  • Notions of private and public, closed and open texts and media
  • Political, legal and ethical ramifications of social reading