Session Title

Vernacular Apocrypha II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Peggy McCracken

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Presider Name

Peggy McCracken

Paper Title 1

The Politics of Power in the French Life of the Evil Pilate

Presenter 1 Name

Jeanette Patterson

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Binghamton Univ.

Paper Title 2

Joseph and Josephus in the Vengeance Nostre Seigneur: Treason as Mainspring of Narrative Invention

Presenter 2 Name

Yasmina Foehr-Janssens

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. de Genève

Paper Title 3

The Veil of Veronica and Fantasies of Reproduction in the Siege of Jerusalem

Presenter 3 Name

Julie Orlemanski

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Start Date

8-5-2020 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1340

Description

Vernacular translations, adaptations, and elaborations of biblical apocrypha are a rich but neglected source for understandings not just of popular theology or religion, but also of gender relations, and positions of privilege and forms of exclusion structured by belief and piety. Found as individual texts or incorporated into fictions (the Veronica legend is folded into grail stories, for example), apocryphal stories are a ubiquitous but neglected genre in medieval literary studies. This session seeks to highlight the literary complexity and inventiveness of vernacular apocrypha and the pertinence of these texts to critical questions about social relations and social hierarchies.

Peggy McCracken

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May 8th, 1:30 PM

Vernacular Apocrypha II

Schneider 1340

Vernacular translations, adaptations, and elaborations of biblical apocrypha are a rich but neglected source for understandings not just of popular theology or religion, but also of gender relations, and positions of privilege and forms of exclusion structured by belief and piety. Found as individual texts or incorporated into fictions (the Veronica legend is folded into grail stories, for example), apocryphal stories are a ubiquitous but neglected genre in medieval literary studies. This session seeks to highlight the literary complexity and inventiveness of vernacular apocrypha and the pertinence of these texts to critical questions about social relations and social hierarchies.

Peggy McCracken