Session Title

Markets in Medieval Societies: Commercial "Revolution"

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval History Workshop, Harvard Univ.

Organizer Name

Elena Shadrina

Organizer Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Presider Name

Elena Shadrina

Paper Title 1

Competition between Mercantile and Fiscal Interests in the Setting of Venetian Monetary Policy

Presenter 1 Name

Alan Stahl

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Princeton Univ.

Paper Title 2

How Tyrol Can Help to Explain Economic Practices of Medieval Credit Markets

Presenter 2 Name

Stephan Koehler

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. Mannheim

Paper Title 3

Don't Bind Your Own Business: Commercial Curse Tablets in the Late Roman Marketplace

Presenter 3 Name

Jane Sancinito

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Oberlin College

Start Date

10-5-2020 8:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1060

Description

The economic history of Europe has been framed as a narrative of development of markets out of dark age collapse that culminated with the Industrial Revolution. The “commercial revolution” of the Middle Ages is presented as a pivotal step in the evolution of modern capitalism, with some historians going so far as to claim that capitalism itself originated in premodern Europe. In the course of our panel, we hope to interrogate this teleological account of economic development and to examine whether modern concepts such as capitalism are useful when studying the Middle Ages. We intend to foster an open conversation on the place of the market in medieval societies, and to interrogate the interplay of commercial activity with modes of local production and labor organization, with culture and moral norms, with legal systems, and with politics. Submissions related to all parts of the medieval world are welcome. Ryan Low

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 10th, 8:30 AM

Markets in Medieval Societies: Commercial "Revolution"

Fetzer 1060

The economic history of Europe has been framed as a narrative of development of markets out of dark age collapse that culminated with the Industrial Revolution. The “commercial revolution” of the Middle Ages is presented as a pivotal step in the evolution of modern capitalism, with some historians going so far as to claim that capitalism itself originated in premodern Europe. In the course of our panel, we hope to interrogate this teleological account of economic development and to examine whether modern concepts such as capitalism are useful when studying the Middle Ages. We intend to foster an open conversation on the place of the market in medieval societies, and to interrogate the interplay of commercial activity with modes of local production and labor organization, with culture and moral norms, with legal systems, and with politics. Submissions related to all parts of the medieval world are welcome. Ryan Low